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  1. #101
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    Why don't they call 4x5 the ideal format? It doesn't require any cropping. Who came up with this term? Sounds like bollocks to me.
    Someone who first marketed a 6x7 or 6x4.25 camera came up with it, I think.

    It is bollocks, I agree. Nothing wrong with those sizes, don't get my wrong, but there's nothing magical about that aspect ratio either. I've been shooting a lot of square photos lately since getting a 6x6 camera, but if one will work better cropped, I'll crop it to 6.45, 6x3.9876509672 or whatever works best for the composition. Same for my 4x5 negs and 35mm.

    The only reason I have a 6x7 roll film back for my 4x5 was that I found one used at the right price and didn't find a 6x9. (Nor am I looking for one now since I also got a 6x7 carrier.)

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    Why don't they call 4x5 the ideal format? It doesn't require any cropping. Who came up with this term? Sounds like bollocks to me.
    They just left out the word rollfilm. It is the ideal rollfilm format, or at least as close as exists.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #103
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    Ahhh, so it was marketing . That makes a lot of sense.

    So what makes 8x10 the ideal paper choice?

  4. #104
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    If you ever shot weddings or studio portraits in volume on MF film, you might remember a time where some pro labs did very high quality machine print enlargements at very low cost.

    An "ideal format" camera used with an eye to filling the frame with a desirable subject would yield a fairly high percentage of photos that didn't have to be cropped and would result in low cost high quality enlargements that would fit easily and quickly into the albums or folders offered for sale by the photographer/studio.

    A film format which is designed to scale up exactly to standard enlargement sizes can be a very efficient tool which helps to maximise profit, and to quickly make customers happy (customers don't like enlargements that require custom frames).

    If all or most of your prints are going to be custom prints, and all or most of them will be custom matted or framed, don't worry about it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #105
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    So what makes 8x10 the ideal paper choice?
    It isn't ideal - it is just widely available, and there are lots of frames or folders or albums that fit it.

    To step back a bit, I don't think that when it comes to film formats that "ideal" refers to some magical aspect ratio - it isn't something like the golden rectangle : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rectangle

    Instead, it refers to something more like "practically useful and efficient", because all of the "ideal" formats just scale easily into the most common enlargement sizes, and therefore make it most easy to compose in the camera for full frame un-cropped prints.

    EDIT 1: 4x5 is one of the so-called ideal formats

    EDIT 2: something that scales easily to 8.5 x 11 is likely to become the next "ideal" format, because more and more digital photographs are being printed on to that size of (inkjet) printer. If you buy a frame from IKEA, good luck getting one that includes a mat that works with 11 x 14 - the frame that would work best with that size of enlargement comes with a mat that is designed for an enlargement from an image consistent with the aspect ratio of an APS-C sensor
    Last edited by MattKing; 08-28-2011 at 11:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #106

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    I like Edit#3

  7. #107

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    Now I've found another local guy with a bunch of RB67 equipment he wants to sell. And unlike the other guy who seems to think they have held their value, this one knows they aren't worth much these days. My odds of getting a good deal just got better.

    How much do the trigger grips usually go for? Neither of these guys has one. The only 2 I can find on ebay are about 70-75, and that seems too high when bodies are going for only a few dollars more more.

  8. #108
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Thanks Matt King.

  9. #109
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    Now I've found another local guy with a bunch of RB67 equipment he wants to sell. And unlike the other guy who seems to think they have held their value, this one knows they aren't worth much these days. My odds of getting a good deal just got better.

    How much do the trigger grips usually go for? Neither of these guys has one. The only 2 I can find on ebay are about 70-75, and that seems too high when bodies are going for only a few dollars more more.
    The secret is to look for a Mamiya C330 grip.

    http://www.keh.com/camera/Mamiya-Twi...090451510?r=FE

    It works with the RB (and possibly the RZ?) as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #110

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    How much do the trigger grips usually go for?
    I don't know what the difference between the RB Left grip, the C330 and the M645 Deluxe Left Grip are supposed to be but I have 2 of the M645 grips that came with the 2 M645's I have and they both fit my RB and work perfectly.

    KEH has the M645 grips for $10.



 

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