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  1. #121
    Alan W's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    I use non-C lenses and they are fabulous.
    I've got a non c 50mm that's a beauty.Sharp.Don't be afraid of 'em.

  2. #122

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    Do you clean them with your thumb? ;-)

    I was under the impression C lenses were superior or at least more desirable. No?

  3. #123
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    It's almost distressing, that I can't get myself to break out the 4x5 much anymore...it's just so easy to use the RB67 instead. Only for compositions that demand lens movements do I use the 4x5 any more...given the focusing bellows of the RB67, and the immense coverage of most of the lenses, it's a shame Mamiya didn't include the ability to do lens tilt.
    f/22 and be there.

  4. #124
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    Do you clean them with your thumb? ;-)

    I was under the impression C lenses were superior or at least more desirable. No?
    More desirable? Yes

    But the earlier non-C lenses are good.

    The advantages of the C lenses are:

    1) newer, so the shutters may not be as worn (will vary with each lens of course);
    2) newer, which in a few cases means an updated design; and
    3) newer, and therefore often have some or more advanced multi-coating, resulting in better performance in high flare situations.

    IMHO a well kept and well maintained non-C lens is better than a C lens that has seen heavy and hard use, without the necessary maintenance.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    It's almost distressing, that I can't get myself to break out the 4x5 much anymore...it's just so easy to use the RB67 instead. Only for compositions that demand lens movements do I use the 4x5 any more...given the focusing bellows of the RB67, and the immense coverage of most of the lenses, it's a shame Mamiya didn't include the ability to do lens tilt.

    Thats how I feel on all counts.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    It's almost distressing, that I can't get myself to break out the 4x5 much anymore...it's just so easy to use the RB67 instead. Only for compositions that demand lens movements do I use the 4x5 any more...given the focusing bellows of the RB67, and the immense coverage of most of the lenses, it's a shame Mamiya didn't include the ability to do lens tilt.
    This is way true.

    I did though break out the 4x5 last weekend and had great fun.

    It was really nice not to have to load a reel to develop and man the negatives are nice.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #127

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    I figure its win win no matter what happens, as long as I use the RB some. If I love it and use it all the time, that's great. If it makes me miss 4x5 and causes me to use that more, great. If I end up using both, great. I will admit I'm not looking forward to reels, which I havent used since high school but...if it gets me in the darkroom, its all good. And 6x7 reels cant be as bad as 35mm.

  8. #128
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    I actually think that roll film is much easier and more consistent in the darkroom. With sheet film, it takes more effort to obtain even, scratch free, and most of all, pre-exposure-dust-free negatives. I have to admit that even being careful with sheet film I often deal with black spots from pre-exposure dust. With roll film, I almost never do, partly because I always shoot several 6x7 negatives of the same subject, so even if I did it wouldn't matter.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #129
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Humm, I use reels for 4x5, namely the Jobo 2609n. It's easier to load (somewhat) than 120, but both are pretty much child's play after a bit of practice.

    Sheet film IS a hassle to load into holders and keep (mostly) dust free, and no one can ensure completely dust free film every shot. My routine works pretty well but does take some work - run the air cleaner in the darkroom and wipe down the table with a damp cloth and let it dry. Then I clean each holder and dark slide with a "One Pass Cleaning Roller" I bought years ago from the old F Stops Here, and carefully stack the holders and lay our the slides. In the dark just before loading the film I blow out the holder with compressed air, then after loading the film I turn the holder upside down (that is, film down) and tap the back then slide the darkslid in. I admit it's a PITA but saves more time than it costs not to mention the frustration.

    OTOH, the negatives are just worth it. Plus I like working with the big, slow camera. Doesn't mean I wouldn't also like an RB though, maybe, someday.

  10. #130
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    I agree that sheets can be a challenge compared to rolls.

    This last round I used the JOBO test drum, development was great. I'm new to LFN though and found it's limit on the last few sheets.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin



 

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