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  1. #11
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Skip the changing bag and get a tent. http://www.adorama.com/PFCR.html The bags are hardly any cheaper than this tent and it makes a huge difference in ease of working.

    I have plastic JOBO stuff that i use for color film because I do that with a JOBO CPA2. Tried various plastic models I find spinners useless but invertible tanks are workable. I use stainless reels and tanks for B&W because I find them much easier and faster to work with at every step.

    Hewes reels are great
    .
    Thanks for the link Mark !
    I didn't realize that the tents were so affordable now.
    I always thought they were $150.00 items.

    Ron
    .

  2. #12

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    I like the wider flanges on the AP reels; makes it a lot easier to load the 120 into, compared to the smaller flanges on the Patterson reels (I have both).
    Nikon 35mm, Mamiya 645 & RB67, Leica IIIb, other bits and pieces

  3. #13
    fmajor's Avatar
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    Hi Chazz!

    One from n00b to another - CONGRATULATIONS!!!! I've had my b&w developing stuff, all brand spiffy new, for over a year and *finally* developed my 1st roll a week ago. I've since developed 2 more and really enjoy it.

  4. #14

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    I had two Rondinax 60's, one in new condition, but found that both scratched the film.I went back to Paterson tanks, although they have to be loaded in darkness it is quite quick to learn how to do this and ,of course, no scratches.

  5. #15

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    Don't give up

    Quote Originally Posted by M.A.Longmore View Post
    .
    Don't Give Up !
    Don't Ever Be Discouraged !
    I've been trying to get it right for thirty five years ...

    Ron
    .
    I've been messing with B&W since 1958, and still ain't got it mastered.
    Have a lot of fun with home brew chemistry, so keep plugging away.

    Earl

  6. #16
    chazz's Avatar
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    Well........I just tried another roll of 120. Lost over half the roll this time because of the problem with the film getting jammed. This time it wasn't just some stuff I shot in the back yard. Shot these about 2hrs from home. I really had high hopes for some of these shots. I suppose I'll have to consider learning to use the normal reels in the dark. I was trying to avoid that. I've done it with 35mm and wasn't too crazy about it. I did another roll of 35mm in the other Rondinax and again.....seems to be just fine. I have no intention of letting this put a permanent damper on my developing. I'm just fascinated with those big negatives. Back to the drawing board..........and thanks for the comments.

  7. #17
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Yeah, even with hand rolling, MF film is a bit tougher to load.

    In your place I'd get the tent and some stainless reels and tank.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    In your place I'd get the tent and some stainless reels and tank.
    If you go the stainless route, I would suggest sticking to Hewes reels - the difference in loading ease is terrific.

    The key to loading 120 on a SS reel is to make sure the film is centered in the reel. If it is off-center then it won't load smoothly and you will end up with creases and dimples (showing up as black crescents on the negative).
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #19

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    Don't forget, if things aren't going well when loading a roll, simply put the roll of film in the tank, put the lid on, and take a break.

  10. #20
    photoncatcher's Avatar
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    Take the time to learn how to load stainless steel reels. Once you learn, you'll never go back to anything made of plastic. Either Nikor, or I think Kinderman made/makes them in 30mm, and 120 size. Reels, and tanks can be had pretty cheap at "the Bay". Oh, and invest in a good changing bag. I'm using the same tanks, and reeals that I used in high schol, and I'm heading way to fast for 60.

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