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  1. #1
    chazz's Avatar
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    First time developing 120

    Just developed my first roll of 120 from my Yashica LM in a Rondinax 60 that I recently won on an auction site. The auction included a Rondinax 35U as well.
    I used the 35 first time yesterday. It (the 35u) worked like a charm. I did have some trouble with the 60 at the point where you pull the paper which in turn loads the film into the film chamber inside. It started an accordion roll instead of loading the last three frames, which would be the first three frames on the roll. I lost those three frames.........but the others seem to be perfectly fine. Those negatives are huge compared to 35mm. It's on now. I'm gonna start looking for a 6X7 of some sort. Maybe an old folder from Certo6. I just needed to know that I could develop my own. Has anyone else used the Rondinax 60 and had this same problem with the film not loading properly?

  2. #2

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    I never used the Certo6 but have develop 120 a lot. I love medium format!

    Jeff

  3. #3
    dasBlute's Avatar
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    careful, that's a slippery slope you're teetering at the top of...
    pretty soon you'll be sneeking peeks at 8x10 'dorfs when no one is looking ...

    good for you with the step, keep your eye on the scene

  4. #4

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    I am just about ready to pull the cord on developing my own B&W, I would really appreciate a listing of the equipment you used (or would have like to have used) and any special techniques you used.

    Since you had problems loading the film in the reel, was yours plastic or metal? Any recomendations there? How about Brand names, anybodies stuff better than the rest when it comes to this stuff?

    Did you use a changing bag? If so, please tell me how big it is or what model you would recommend.

    Thanks for any and all advise here......

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

  5. #5
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SafetyBob View Post
    I am just about ready to pull the cord on developing my own B&W, I would really appreciate a listing of the equipment you used (or would have like to have used) and any special techniques you used.

    Since you had problems loading the film in the reel, was yours plastic or metal? Any recomendations there? How about Brand names, anybodies stuff better than the rest when it comes to this stuff?

    Did you use a changing bag? If so, please tell me how big it is or what model you would recommend.

    Thanks for any and all advise here......

    Bob E.
    .
    Don't Give Up !
    Don't Ever Be Discouraged !
    I've been trying to get it right for thirty five years ...

    Ron
    .

  6. #6

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    I have a Rondinax 60 (for the uninitiated, it's a daylight-loading developing tank made by Agfa) which I bought at a car-boot-sale a couple of years ago. It's a cunning device and obviously very economical on chemicals, but I have to admit I haven't tried it yet. I have read the instructions, but I can't understand for the life of me how the film gets loaded into the spiral by that strip of rubber. Is that where the problem occurred? Presumably it must work somehow. I think I have a scrap film somewhere, so if I find it, maybe I'll experiment with that.

    I'm not shooting medium format at present because I don't yet have a scanner to take it, but I'm afraid that when I do, I will probably chicken out and use my Paterson developing tank!

    Steve.
    Last edited by Grytpype; 08-20-2011 at 02:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SafetyBob View Post
    I am just about ready to pull the cord on developing my own B&W, I would really appreciate a listing of the equipment you used (or would have like to have used) and any special techniques you used.

    Since you had problems loading the film in the reel, was yours plastic or metal? Any recomendations there? How about Brand names, anybodies stuff better than the rest when it comes to this stuff?

    Did you use a changing bag? If so, please tell me how big it is or what model you would recommend.

    Thanks for any and all advise here......

    Bob E.
    Hi Bob,

    You'll love developing your own film - especially when you find that all film does *not* have grain the size of golf balls!!!

    I use the following equipment:

    * Paterson Tanks & reels
    * 3 500ml plastic jugs (label them clearly - DEV, STOP, FIX) - available at any supermarket
    * Dev, stop-bath and fixer from your favourite brand (D76 is a good place to start for developer)
    * A thermometer that reads down to at least 18C
    * A bucket to catch used chemicals
    * Running water to rinse your film

    I have a darkroom, so don't use an actual change bag, but a fair sized one, will do the trick no problem. (I have on occasion also loaded film in to the tank in the bathroom of my hotel room - all lights off in the room and a towel at the door to stop any light leaks that may find their way in.)

    Enjoy!!!!

  8. #8

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    I got a 35mm version in a load of junk. Used it once just to see if it would work, which was 'yes' but never touched it again. Just too fiddly (and worrying.. ie. did it load ok) compared to using a normal tank IMO.

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Skip the changing bag and get a tent. http://www.adorama.com/PFCR.html The bags are hardly any cheaper than this tent and it makes a huge difference in ease of working.

    I have plastic JOBO stuff that i use for color film because I do that with a JOBO CPA2. Tried various plastic models I find spinners useless but invertible tanks are workable. I use stainless reels and tanks for B&W because I find them much easier and faster to work with at every step.

    Hewes reels are great
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    Wade D's Avatar
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    The Paterson tanks and reels are easy to load. Even in a changing bag. I've never had a problem with 120 film.

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