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  1. #11

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    lilmsmaggie,
    I shoot a reasonable amount of Efke 820 aura 120 in my Mamiya 6 (the 'modern' predecessor to the Mamiya 7).

    I have never loaded it in darkness and frequently do so in bright sunshine but in shade of my body. It works perfectly.

    HIE, however, does need to be loaded in a darkroom. Bitter experience here!!

    Hope this helps,
    Niall

  2. #12
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olwick View Post
    Thanks Dwain,

    I use an R72 filter on mine and it works great.

    BTW, I still think you're being too cautious with the film. I've changed rolls in the middle of sunny Monument Valley just using my shadow or the shady inside of the truck, but it's up to you.
    Well, I've never used IR film before BTW - what ISO are you shooting at?
    The Efke literature says ISO 100-200 (I guess depending on lightinging conditions).
    I would imagine that some may shoot at a slower ISO because of the results they've obtained.

    I haven't received the R72 yet but its on its way. It doesn't appear that there is a listed filter factor for it. I've seen older internet posts saying to use a factor of 5.
    But no explanation as to why.



    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Bell View Post
    lilmsmaggie,
    I shoot a reasonable amount of Efke 820 aura 120 in my Mamiya 6 (the 'modern' predecessor to the Mamiya 7).

    I have never loaded it in darkness and frequently do so in bright sunshine but in shade of my body. It works perfectly.

    HIE, however, does need to be loaded in a darkroom. Bitter experience here!!

    Hope this helps,
    Niall
    Well sounds like I can safely load/unload in subdued light.

    Kodak HIE is no longer available - at least here in the states.

  3. #13

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    I shoot it at between ISO 6 and 25. It's very slow when shooting IR with the R72.

  4. #14
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    BTW - what ISO are you shooting at?
    The Efke literature says ISO 100-200 (I guess depending on lightinging conditions).
    I would imagine that some may shoot at a slower ISO because of the results they've obtained.
    I have found that Maco 820C Aura with a 720nm filter the correct speed was ISO 3 for me in bright sun. But I still bracket most shots by over exposing 1 stop. Sometimes this has save a shot where there wasn't as much IR light as I thought.

    Even more of the Wood effect can be achieved with an 87 filter. There the ISO of 1.5 seems best.

    I have no issues loading into a Mamiya 7 in daylight by keeping my back to the sun and shading the camera.

  5. #15
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    Does the Mamiya allow you to set an ISO that low? I believe my 35mm goes down to ISO 25 not sure about the Mamiya 7ii.

    How do you achieve such a low setting



    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    I have found that Maco 820C Aura with a 720nm filter the correct speed was ISO 3 for me in bright sun. But I still bracket most shots by over exposing 1 stop. Sometimes this has save a shot where there wasn't as much IR light as I thought.

    Even more of the Wood effect can be achieved with an 87 filter. There the ISO of 1.5 seems best.

    I have no issues loading into a Mamiya 7 in daylight by keeping my back to the sun and shading the camera.

  6. #16
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Does the Mamiya allow you to set an ISO that low? I believe my 35mm goes down to ISO 25 not sure about the Mamiya 7ii.

    How do you achieve such a low setting
    I use an external light meter (pentax digital spot, if that makes any difference). Then I set the speed manually. I usually end up in the one or more second range, so I always use a tripod. You could also just manually adjust the shutter speed after noting the camera's reading by x number of stops based on the set ISO on the camera.

  7. #17
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    An external light meter makes sense but isn't it calibrated to read visible light not IR just like the camera's internal meter?

    I'm wondering if that's where that "factor of 5" for the R72 filter factor comes into play.

    I was actually thinking of using a tripod mounted camera with an ISO of 25 at f8 f11 as a starting point.


    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    I use an external light meter (pentax digital spot, if that makes any difference). Then I set the speed manually. I usually end up in the one or more second range, so I always use a tripod. You could also just manually adjust the shutter speed after noting the camera's reading by x number of stops based on the set ISO on the camera.

  8. #18
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I think some external meters read a bit of IR, but usually it's dwarfed by the amount of visible light. I don't know of any common meters designed to read only IR, but I imagine putting a filter on the Pentax spot could make it only IR sensitive. So far I haven't felt I need to bother with this. If I shot this film in other lighting situations an IR meter would probably be needed.

    I think your best bet is to go out with a roll of film and meter with both the external meter, and the in camera meter. Record the results of both and bracket from ISO .75 to 25 (.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 25) and then develop and print them. Pick a scene with some shadows with detail and lots of foliage, blue sky, and a few clouds. Do this close to noon. From this you should be able to correlate your camera's meter to the handheld meter and find the ideal film speed for both in bright sunlight.

    Just for your reference, I should add my speeds are based on taking a shadow reading and placing it on zone 3. This is the same as I shoot all negative film. Gives me negatives with good shadow details that print nicely. Most of the regular black and white films come out best using half box speed with this method and my equipment if that helps you relate it to your normal exposure methods.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    An external light meter makes sense but isn't it calibrated to read visible light not IR just like the camera's internal meter?

    I'm wondering if that's where that "factor of 5" for the R72 filter factor comes into play.

    I was actually thinking of using a tripod mounted camera with an ISO of 25 at f8 f11 as a starting point.
    If you have ever looked through an R72 filter you have probably said to yourself something like: "I cannot see anything through this filter".

    That is because the filter blocks almost all the visible light.

    All the estimates you will read about what EI you should set on your meter are based on two factors:

    1) In order for the IR film to work and give results that show IR illumination, you have to block out some or all of the visible light; and
    2) There is, generally speaking, a rough correlation between the amounts of visible and IR light in a scene.

    So the way the metering works is that you meter all the light (visible and IR), use a filter that cuts out the visible portion, and then use the information you have about the correlation between the total amount of light present (as measured by the meter) and the proportion of same that consists of the IR light to which the film is sensitive.

    So when someone says they have had most success exposing a film with a nominal ISO of 200 with an EI of 3 when using an R72 filter, they are essentially saying that the available light consists of a mixture of IR light and visible light that is 6 stops brighter than the predominantly IR light that is left after the R72 filter has done its work.

    Hope this helps.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
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    Thanks Matt!


    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you have ever looked through an R72 filter you have probably said to yourself something like: "I cannot see anything through this filter".

    That is because the filter blocks almost all the visible light.

    All the estimates you will read about what EI you should set on your meter are based on two factors:

    1) In order for the IR film to work and give results that show IR illumination, you have to block out some or all of the visible light; and
    2) There is, generally speaking, a rough correlation between the amounts of visible and IR light in a scene.

    So the way the metering works is that you meter all the light (visible and IR), use a filter that cuts out the visible portion, and then use the information you have about the correlation between the total amount of light present (as measured by the meter) and the proportion of same that consists of the IR light to which the film is sensitive.

    So when someone says they have had most success exposing a film with a nominal ISO of 200 with an EI of 3 when using an R72 filter, they are essentially saying that the available light consists of a mixture of IR light and visible light that is 6 stops brighter than the predominantly IR light that is left after the R72 filter has done its work.

    Hope this helps.

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