Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,693   Posts: 1,482,431   Online: 804
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    Graham_Martin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    213
    Images
    6

    Best camera type for landscapes?

    I just purchased a Fuji GA645Zi primarily to be used for landscape photography when we take a trip to Hawaii in December. I wanted a lightweight camera to take with me, However, I have since found a number of comments on various websites that Medium Format is less suited to landscapes due to its reduced depth of field. They all pretty much conclude that MF really shines for portraits.

    Is that a fair comment to make about MF cameras? If so would my Nikon F100 be better suited for landscapes when used with the appropriate lens? One of the reasons I bought the Fuji was to get greater detail in my landscape images. After all, Peter Lik uses a Medium Format for his landscapes. In the MF arena, would it make any difference if I were to get something like a Voigtlander 690 with its huge negatives?
    Last edited by Graham_Martin; 08-27-2011 at 07:26 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Change reply options
    Graham from St. Augustine, FL

  2. #2
    Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,493
    Images
    30
    I feel it's all about how you apply these cameras to a scene. Less depth of field? With my M7II and the 43mm, I can focus on something 1ft away to infinity and keep it sharp, so I don't know exactly what they're talking about (likewise with the Fuji GW690 and ye old Mamiya Press camera). For a similar scene, a LF system would probably be stopped down to f/64. Nevertheless, I found 6x9 best for landscape work, only second to a 4x5. The view camera has the advantage of really giving you a framed perspective on what the final image will look like. Other than that, the camera you have chosen will give great results depending on how you use it. Like any tool, it needs mastering, so maybe practice before you head out and find where the sweet spots with the lens and f/stops are. Remember, with an RF, sometimes its best to scale focus and ignore the split screen altogether. I do this all the time and it has yet to fail me.

    Just some thoughts for ya.
    K.S. Klain

  3. #3
    Graham_Martin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    213
    Images
    6
    Thanks for the quick reply. I have only run one roll through the Fuji and am waiting to get the negs back. I made some mistakes with the shots because I had not figured out some of the settings properly. I'm going to do some more landscapes this week and will stop down pretty small and use a tripod.
    Graham from St. Augustine, FL

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Near Edinburgh - The Capital of SCOTLAND! - which ain't part of England!
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Graham_Martin View Post
    Is that a fair comment to make about MF cameras?
    Personally I think not... Certainly for close-ups and medium close-ups the relatively narrow DOF which can be achieved allows good 'isolation'. And thus there are certainly advantages for portrait work... But MF and LF are obviously very capable of producing the most spectacular levels of detail in 'longer range' work... And very great DOF with the correct settings; if that's what you want to achieve... It's about technique surely?

    The bigger negative is the key for me. I do almost-no 35mm work these days. all my analogue work is Mamiya 645 or RB67; the latter being my 'Landscape' kit...

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,377
    Images
    15
    How long is a piece of string?
    Russian photographer Oleg Novikov has made the 6x6 format using Hasselblad in landscapes famous from Beijing to the Russian Steppes. You can go your whole life on 35mm, or squirrel out to large format (how does 8x10++ sound?)


    "Comments on various websites...". on what format is best for which application. Are just that. At best, heresy. I want to know where the experience of these commentators are, and what they are basing their judgement on. In essence, what other people are using and find best is based on their experience (sometimes not even that), hopefully garnered and built up through experimenting until they find a format that suits them and (this is most important) their work. Further, it is bad judgement to base your needs on what others are using — there are thousands of variations. Your first task is to gain experience with the Fuji (I'm personally sure it is a good choice for landscapes, but it is not the only good choice).

    Peter Lik (based in Queensland here in Australia) has many years of experience with his large format cameras, at first dabbling in medium format, and he is very constrained in his approach — there is no wasted space in his composition, nothing there that shouldn't be and balance where it is needed. You could also observe what the late Tasmanian photographer Peter Dombrovskis achieved with a Linhof and 3 lenses. He, too, initally used 35mm (for abour 17 years), then medium format (6x6) and finally the Linhof. His early efforts with the Linhof were unremarkable. It's what came through years of studious precision and application that put him on the map. And he knew his subject — the landscape — extremely well.

    Go out with the Fuji and put it through its paces. I'm sure it is eminently up to the task. :-)
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  6. #6
    papagene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Western Mass., USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,174
    Images
    111
    Here are a few photos I took in the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado last year with a couple of Fuji cameras, a GW670 II & a GSW690 III. I think who ever is giving out that info about MF cameras not good for landscape work doesn't really know what they are talking about.


    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=2072

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=2072

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=2072

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=2072
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    The best camera is the one you have when a photograph needs to be made.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  8. #8
    Graham_Martin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    213
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by papagene View Post
    Here are a few photos I took in the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado last year with a couple of Fuji cameras, a GW670 II & a GSW690 III. I think who ever is giving out that info about MF cameras not good for landscape work doesn't really know what they are talking about.
    Those types of images are beautiful landscape shots. Do you find the GSW690 bulky and/or heavy to travel with? I am specifically thinking of carrying it on a plane and any extensive walking. (I am 65 years old, and my old legs ain't what they used to be. )
    Graham from St. Augustine, FL

  9. #9
    papagene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Western Mass., USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,174
    Images
    111
    Graham... I just turned 60 and I don't find them too bulky. I usually carry both and a tripod, though those shots were all hand held. At the altitudes that I was hiking I felt the two Fujis were a better option than a full 4x5 kit with holders.
    I have to confess though that I work in a warehouse at a quite physical job and I also work out so I am able to lug around my camera equipment. And I have to waer a small brace on one knee... no ACL!
    As far as carrying the cameras on a plane, the two fit in a Domke bag that easily fits in the overhead space.
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  10. #10
    Graham_Martin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    213
    Images
    6
    Thanks Gene. It sounds like you are probably stronger than me, but that I should be able to manage. I too have a small brace on on knee for arthritis. (getting older ain't as much fun as I thought it would be). Do you have both the 670 and 690 so that you can have different film in each?
    Graham from St. Augustine, FL

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin