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  1. #11

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    Christopher Walrath makes a good point if one is fine-tuning exposures as with the Zone System or such. I did tests years ago determining the filter factor for various filters when shooting objects of different color. So I knew how far green would move with a yellow filter and what zone it would end up it, where red would be, where blue would be.

    Fortunately, with some therapy and proper medication, I stopped this kind of silliness A little attention and taking notes of expected and actual results for a few rolls of film should dial in all you need to know, whatever method you settle upon. Memory and experience are much more interesting than charts and numbers.

  2. #12
    Alan W's Avatar
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    I've got a pentax me super that has had a yellow filter on it for years,I've got a pentax 645 that I regularly use a red filter on and both in camera meters have always been spot on in metering for filter factor.I use an rz67 with a minolta iiif light meter and any time I use a filter on this camera I just hold the filter over the meter and take the reading,it always comes out fine,maybe I've got lower standards than some but I've always been happy to let the meter do any adjusting when it comes to filters.

  3. #13

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    I've always looked at filter factors like this: The factor is an adjustment to account for the neutral density of the filter. The filter is designed to hold back light in every color other than it's own (some filters being "narrow band", which are more discrete, and some "broad band", which are less so, allowing more passage of other colors). So the filter factor for a red filter is used to bring the reds back to the same exposure level as before the filter was applied. Everything else will expose less than without the filter, which is the desired result. Does this make sense?
    In any case, I've never metered through the filter, for the reasons of spectral sensitivity differences (film to meter) stated by others here.
    I think also, your particular film, filters, equipment, processing, etc. also probably require your own tweaking and experiencial judgment over time.

  4. #14
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I meter bare-back, then apply the filter factor to the reading,

    I may fudge the factor a little bit depending on the scene and whether I want to emphasize or attenuate specific areas.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  5. #15
    Graham_Martin's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the advice. Sounds like I probably need to try both methods and then see what works best for me.
    Graham from St. Augustine, FL

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