Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,593   Posts: 1,546,087   Online: 875
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8

    Fluorescent Lighting compensation

    Help! Having used a digital camera it has been easy to compensate for fluorescent lighting and now (since converting to film) I am stumped as to how to compensate for different lighting conditions. I will be shooting (at a childrens day care centre) with mixed natural and fluoro lighting without flash and with both a MF Hasselblad 501c/m and 35mm Nikon F90X with both colour and b&w film.
    How best do I compensate with film for these conditions?
    Thank you for your help!
    Kind regards,
    Nicole

    PS - Just goes to show how slack a digital photographer can become! Forgets all the basics!

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    I normally used a FLD filter when shooting under florescent lights, it also depends on how your going to be using your flash as sometimes the flash can overcome the florescent lights, you need to do some testing in the conditions you will be shooting in.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties
    Satin Snow(TM) Ground Glass

  3. #3
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Hi Nicole,

    As Dave mentioned, get yourself an FLD filter and do some testing. Several manufacturers make them.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  4. #4
    bmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,156
    Images
    9
    FLD filter on the lens, and a Green Filter on your flash will do the trick as long as you don't have any natural light showing in the scene.
    hi!

  5. #5
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    Thanks everyone. I won't be using flash at all on the littlies.
    I'll check out the FLD filter.
    Can this filter be used for only fluoro lighting or mixed fluoro & natural?
    Cheers
    Nicole

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    33
    Images
    2
    As Dave P and Art note, do some testing. There is no standard fluorescent light, so they all have a different spectrum, which typically have particularly strong "lines" (colors). Tungsten lamps and sunlight behave like "blackbodies" -- heat a blackbody and it will glow with a characteristic smooth spectrum that is easy to correct for by filtration. Fluorescent lights are not so easy, partly because different lights have different lines, so you'd need a filter for each type, and partly because the spectrum may shift somewhat with age. So 1) yes get a FLD, but test, and 2) if you have a fair amount of natural light in your mix you might be better off living without the filter -- again, test. If you're curious, you could try looking at different colors under different lights: if some colors look different under different lights, the FLD won't work the same with the different lights (the phenomenon is called metamerism)

  7. #7
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,735
    Images
    139
    I try to avoid flourescent lighting at all times... even when I'm not shooting!

    Anyway, I may be wrong here, but can't you compensate for the flourescent light in the darkroom with color neg film. I used to assign photographers when I worked at a magazine, and whenever we had a school or a hospital situation to shoot, where light was always questionable, we would often shoot color neg, and get the color corrections done in the darkroom. (It's been awhile since I worked there, I'm sure they do it on computer now... the bums.) I don't shoot a lot of color, and never print it myself, so maybe others could address how to go about it in the darkroom.

  8. #8
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Normally if it can be corrected with a filter taking the picture, it can also be corrected in the darkroom with a filter.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow(TM) Ground Glass

  9. #9
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Dave,

    You can, but it's always better to correct it in capture. I guess it's the same advice I give whenever I hear "I'll just fix it in Photoshop." :-O

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  10. #10
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Art,

    I agree 100%, it always easier to start with a correct image capture, than to try and fix it later.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow(TM) Ground Glass

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin