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  1. #11

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    Some great advice here! Thanks!

    I heard that I shouldn't clean this myself, as I will end up wiping off some coating on the insides of the glass. Is that true? Or can i clean it as described, make sure there isn't any dust (perhaps use a bit of compressed air) and put everything back together with no worries?

  2. #12

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    Don't scrub the thing, tissue and lens cleaner or ammonia solution.
    Don't press the tissue flat, make a ball or wad about 3/16-1/4" and use a circular motion.
    It's going to take several applications, just take it easy.
    Older lenses have much softer internal coatings than newer, careful anyhow.

    BTW I've successfully removed inner coatings myself. intentionally(cough), right
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    Don't scrub the thing, tissue and lens cleaner or ammonia solution.
    Don't press the tissue flat, make a ball or wad about 3/16-1/4" and use a circular motion.
    It's going to take several applications, just take it easy.
    Older lenses have much softer internal coatings than newer, careful anyhow.

    BTW I've successfully removed inner coatings myself. intentionally(cough), right
    I was thinking of using one of those cloths for glasses. I heard that using tissue paper can end up creasing because of some stiff fibers or something...

  4. #14
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    Hello, I'm rather new, but I've done a few lens jobs.

    If you DO clean the lens yourself, you want to take every effort to document the way and order in which the lens comes apart so you can reverse the steps when it comes time to put it all back. I use small parts organizers to keep track of what parts come out during each 'step' in disassembly. If you have a digital camera...use good lighting and photo every step. Trust me on this...be as explicit as possible during disassembly so assembly is easy. What the others said about a spanner is good. If you can't get a hold of a spanner that works, modify some cheap pliers. Grind or use heat and hammer to flatten the jaws. Don't try to pull a cheap MacGuyver here, one slip and you risk destroying the glass.

    For the actual cleaning, spit works. The enzymes break down the majority of mold/fungus without harming the myriad of coatings found on lenses. THEN....set all the parts that showed signs of fungus in a sunny window for a week at least. You may think you got it all with the spit/cleaner...but trust me, there is a good chance spores are still lurking, waiting to breed more evil balls of filth after you put it ALL back together.

    Last of all.... google google GOOGLE! There are tons of people out there doing their own CLAs and you may get lucky. Someone may have posted a CLA for your exact lens. You can learn from their success or failure.

    One bonus of having a pro do it is you generally get some sort of guarantee. However...do it yourself and you gain much more in the long-run.

  5. #15

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    If you use the micro fiber cloth, it still needs to have enough "cush" so as to not remove the coating.
    Try wadding a tissue or cotton ball inside the lens cleaning cloth.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  6. #16
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    I got a moldy enlarging lens that was easy to take apart, I cleaned it with a 50/50 mix of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. I used cotton buds (organic cotton balls that said bleached white in peroxide).

    Then after cleaning the fungus and drying with cotton balls, I did a final cleaning with denatured alcohol. Lens looks great. Coatings stayed intact but, it wasn't a Hassy, so I make no claim this will work for you. The hardest part is getting the correct spanners.

    I did a ton of reading and was led to this process (the 50/50 for the fungus and denatured alcohol to get off the grease caused by the breakdown of the organisms). Seemed to work for me.

    Good luck!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbryld View Post
    But its value is not that great anymore, correct?

    I'll run a film through it and see how the photographs are affected. Wouldn't you characterise the problem to be quite severe, though?
    Sorry to disagree. Fungus in a lens is like Prostatic Cancer; it takes 20 or 30 years to kill you and you usually die from a heart attack first, or pneumonia. And the pictures continue to be good.
    " A loving and caring heart is the beginning of all knowledge " ~ Thomas Carlyle ~

  8. #18

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    I have worked on dozens of lenses with fungus in them. The best way to prevent fungus is to expose the glass to sunlight from time to time. Fungus, like mold, doesn't tolerate direct sunlight or UV light.

    To remove the fungus, I use pure cotton swabs slightly moistened with lens cleaning fluid, and a small amount of toothpaste. Rub the lens with the cotton swab in a small circular motion without applying too much pressure. If the fungus has not fully etched the lens coating, this should remove it.

    The most difficult part of the process is getting the lens back together without having dust particles trapped inside. Very careful cleaning and a blow brush are necessary, as well as working in as dust free an environment as you can find.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pumalite View Post
    Sorry to disagree. Fungus in a lens is like Prostatic Cancer; it takes 20 or 30 years to kill you and you usually die from a heart attack first, or pneumonia. And the pictures continue to be good.
    I'd agree with that statement with respect to "Fungus Damaged Coating" but if there is live fungus in a lens, I'd get rid of that right away.

  10. #20
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    Fungus can spread to other lenses?

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