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  1. #21
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie View Post
    Fungus can spread to other lenses?
    Yea it sure can.
    But the correct environment needs to be present in the first place for the spores to thrive.
    Damp dark humid places like some camera bags can even be bad news.

    IDK but I researched this once and read on a webpage (take it for what it's worth) that the spores are present all around us anyway. They just need the right environment before they can grow.

    Also I wouldn't use toothpaste an any Zeiss glass I own
    What about the spores inside the rest of the lens?

  2. #22

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    fungus doesn't spread between lenses. Spores exist in all the air all the time. They exist in all lenses. It takes the right environment for them to grow. If it grows on one it could grow on others in the same environment, but it doesn't "spread" like a communicable disease between humans.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie View Post
    Fungus can spread to other lenses?
    If they have what to feed on, yes, they might spread to other lenses that use the same body. Some of the fungus feed on the deteriorated balsam that holds groups of lenses together, others feed on the deteriorated oil where there is a shutter unit between the lenses.
    Thats why its good to run most central shutters almost dry, with tiny scent of oil or graphite on critical pivots.
    The best prophylactic is to have Your lenses cleaned with alkaline solution every now and then. UV is not an option when acid environment is present inside the lenses.. as in most cases.
    Generally speaking, fungus or other types of bacterias are very intelligent, so once they are present.. You will need a lot of luck and mojo to save that lens.
    Cellulose triacetate films can develop bacterias relatively fast, when not stored properly. Thats another way to get Your camera infected.

  4. #24
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Does anyone have the specs as to temp & humidity needed for these things to propagate?

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    Does anyone have the specs as to temp & humidity needed for these things to propagate?
    if the pH is less than 7, even a slight humidity might boost growth.

  6. #26
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    I'm in Texas where it's hot as hell - humid in summer - but keep all lenses inside at 76 degrees. I bought a bargain lens for $11 from KEH that looks like a science experiment there's so much fungus. It just got quarantined to bubble wrap and it's own leather bag. Will isolation be enough or should it move to its own room? I have no others infected.

    Also - how does air have ph value? I know soil and water does, but that's where it ends for me.

  7. #27

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    You can store it in a box/bag that have a small bag full of silica gel and one full with baking soda.
    As a precaution You can have the same In Your photo bag.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie View Post
    Also - how does air have ph value? I know soil and water does, but that's where it ends for me.
    The same way as human breath have pH.
    Check Your saliva pH with a litmus and You will get the idea.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Katie View Post
    Also - how does air have ph value? I know soil and water does, but that's where it ends for me.
    The same way as human breath have pH.
    Check Your saliva pH with a litmus and You will get the idea.
    Katies question is very valid, just take a look how pH is defined. Based on that definition people started calling anything which might behave like an acid when dissolved in water as "low pH" and anything which could possibly behave caustic as "high pH".

    In other words, "low pH breath" and "high pH solids" are nothing but careless use of chemical terminology.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Katies question is very valid, just take a look how pH is defined. Based on that definition people started calling anything which might behave like an acid when dissolved in water as "low pH" and anything which could possibly behave caustic as "high pH".

    In other words, "low pH breath" and "high pH solids" are nothing but careless use of chemical terminology.
    It is so nice to have just another quote from Wikipedia
    Any practical knowledge outside of the common frame or the so beaten up "standard laboratory conditions"?
    I am curious to hear how many people are aware (first hand experience) of basic stuff, like the CO2 concentration of the air inside a lens and what is necessary for H2CO3 ?
    Let alone histone clusters, o-orsellinic acid or more esoteric stuff.

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