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  1. #91
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agphotography View Post
    So I'm dabbling with the idea (again) of picking up a medium format camera. This would honestly only be used for fun and probably some candid street photography (I can imagine the reactions of people seeing one haha!)

    Anyways I'm trying to figure out what my best options are going to be.

    Some facts: I am not particular to any one format, I'm thinking I would be fine with a fixed lens, but modular cameras are not out of the question (future expansion, especially if Digital Backs are available), I'm going to have about $4-900 to work with.

    I owned a Fuji GW670III for a short time, and while the image quality was amazing, I just didn't really care for how the camera felt in my hands. It felt a bit too "plasticky", I'm partial to metal cameras for some reason.

    Regardless of my prior fuji experience, the GW690II is still on the table of interest, but not the III. I am also considering a TLR (thinking Yashica Mat 124g?). Also possibly one of the Fuji 645s? The GS645s sounded interesting because it was manual focus and had a range finder (not just scale focus).

    Anyways I am open to suggestions from you guys. I am not looking to necessarily build out a kit right now. One lens would be fine (I am a big fan of 35mm and 50mm in 24x36 terms).

    So what are some of your favorites in that price range?

    - Abram
    mamiya6 or7
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #92

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    I agree with Brian. You can use any camera and any format for almost any type of photography, just pick one up and learn to use it. Adjust your style to the camera or at least decide what your style is and then see what camera may fit it. Shotgunning will drive you crazy, empty your purse and make you insane.

    I've work from guys with a ton of money invested in a ton of gear while their best work comes from some amatuer pre-WWI 35mm camera that is beat to heck and cost them probably $5 at some flea market. I have a lot of bucks tied up in my Bronica and can say some of my better work came from either my Polaroid 180 or 195 and the Ziess 35mm Ikonta using the Sunny 16 system.

  3. #93

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    Personally, I'm a Big fan of the Agfa Isolette. I, II, and III.

    So easy to carry, And with the mid range Apotar lens more than enough capable of decent shots.

    Affordable, Reliable and light weight, Whats not to like? (And VERY easy to work on)

  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corto Maltese View Post
    Personally, I'm a Big fan of the Agfa Isolette. I, II, and III.

    So easy to carry, And with the mid range Apotar lens more than enough capable of decent shots.

    Affordable, Reliable and light weight, Whats not to like? (And VERY easy to work on)
    Just what I needed to hear: I'm very tempted by the chance to get a sweet Isolette III Mark II with upgraded leather bellows, late reformulation of the 75/3.5 Solinar and Synchro-Compur MXV. Same lens and shutter as the Super Isolette, at 1/3 the price. You may have just pushed me over the edge.

  5. #95
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agphotography View Post
    How is shooting the bronica for portrait images? That is the appeal of the RZ/RB system with the rotating backs.
    I will also admit that with the P67 I like the sound of that 105 f/2.4
    It's fine, other than the poor mfd of the lenses. You really need to have an extension tube if you want head shots. It's kind of a pain.

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by prumpkah View Post
    Just what I needed to hear: I'm very tempted by the chance to get a sweet Isolette III Mark II with upgraded leather bellows, late reformulation of the 75/3.5 Solinar and Synchro-Compur MXV. Same lens and shutter as the Super Isolette, at 1/3 the price. You may have just pushed me over the edge.
    Picked this up today and it's a real cupcake in primo condition. A sweet 6x6 folder! Am looking forward to taking it out for a spin soon. Any advice from experienced users?

  7. #97
    rhmimac's Avatar
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    Shooting a new lubitel166+ for a year now,a plastic camera but for entering MF you can swap from 6•4.5 to 6•6 in a minute,to find your preference: square or rectangular
    Sent from my Lumia 610 using Board Express

  8. #98

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    I just picked up my first MF camera, a Yashica 24 from a fine fellow here on APUG. I'm very happy with it. Image quality is exceptional and the camera is not very heavy if you wanted to hit the streets with it. I haven't done so yet but will soon. It's a real treat composing with a TLR, and a lot easier to use than I thought it would be.

  9. #99

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    I may be a little late to the thread but you can't go wrong with a mamiya tlr system. 1K will get you a bunch of stuff with a little careful and patient searching on ebay. The glass is sharp sharp sharp, and you don't need closeup lenses or tubes for close work, those bellows extend out forever.

  10. #100
    Pumalite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandermarijn View Post
    I had a GS645s twice and sold it twice. To me this is one of those cameras that is better on paper than in real life. Some cons are personal, others more arguable:
    - the shutter is loud for being a leaf shutter
    - the shutter release button's travel is not so smooth, which negates some of the advantages of the vibration-free (if noisy) leaf shutter
    - the default orientation is vertical
    - the viewfinder is rather distorted and not very accurate (not as good as my Bessa R2A at least)
    - the rangefinder spot is not as clear and easy to use as some others (Bessa R2A again, no comparison)
    - I never really liked the focusing tab
    - there is some clutter on the smallish lens, with the aperture, shutter speeds and focusing ring all next to each other
    - the camera feels plasticky
    - the lens protection bar is not pretty
    - the lens is sharp but also very contrasty (typically Fuji), a bit too much so for b&w to my taste
    - the mfd (1m/3ft) is too long for a wide (60mm) lens
    It's not a terrible camera, just one that I could never quite like, even after trying hard.

    In the price range that you indicate (400-900 USD) a Rolleiflex with a 3.5 Planar/Xenotar would be the most likeable choice for me. I would avoid the Tessar/Xenar models. The Planars/Xenotars are better at wider apertures and have (much) flatter fields. A used but well-working Planar/Xenotar 3,5 (not mint or near mint) should just fit your budget.

    There are many (types of) medium format cameras around to choose from given your budget and preferencec. Maybe you should try to find out first what type of camera fits you best (rangefinder, SLR, TLR). Admittedly this is a difficult task if you've never handled one of each category.
    +1 for the Rolleirflex with the Planar 3.5
    " A loving and caring heart is the beginning of all knowledge " ~ Thomas Carlyle ~

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