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  1. #1

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    Mamiya C330 lens filters? (180mm + 65mm don't fit)

    Actually I'm using a C220; but that doesn't really matter (plus the c330 is so much more common)

    With the 180mm and 65mm lenses; the lens are so closely spaced that they can't accomdate a uv filter on both lenses. Do you have any suggestions with how to attach a filter? Or a brand of a thin UV filter?

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I can't speak for others, but I only use filters on the taking lens. I have a cheat sheet to figure filter factors for exposure compensation. Is there any particular reason you want filters on both lenses.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #3

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    I too have never heard or seen anyone using a filter on both lenses. In fact a dark filter would make it hard to focus the camera.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #4

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    We all know that the condition of the viewing lens won't affect (effect or affect? I always get the two mixed up) the image quality.

    Too be perfectly honest, with my giant gorilla hands; i tend to manhandle my lenses; especially when changing lenses. I also get knocked around a lot in the street where I like to take street shots. Quite often the rush of the crowd push back my shoulder and throws my camera into something or someone else.

    To that end; I do like putting a filter on the viewing lens as well as a precautionary measure.

    also: it might be useful to adjust the polaroizer.

  5. #5

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    I always put the lens cap on before changing lenses and use the plastic caps for the rear elements. But then I don't attempt to use this camera for street photography.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6

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    There are slim filters on the new & used market.
    These are/were marketed for use on wide angle lenses, or for lenses with slip-on lens hoods and attachments..
    Not as common as others and usually quite costly when compared to other regular filters.

    A neat trick, due to the close physical proximity of the (Siamese) Twin Mamiya, 'C' lenses, is to install the filter of choice on the upper viewing lens....first.
    Mark an index spot (top-dead-center, for example), on that filter and the outer lens barrel, then remove the filter.

    Now with the filter removed, file away a flat, or a portion of the outer ring of the filter ring, at the bottom most point of the filter ring, a point that will be directly above the Siamese top of the lower taking lens.
    Now, when the filter is re-installed on the upper lens, and aligned to the index mark, a filter, any filter(?) can now be installed on the lower lens.

    Your choice? How many filters are you going to file/modify, to be used on just the upper half of your Mamiya TLR lens sets? For most, just one per lens set! A clear or a minimal skylight/haze for protection...that's it.
    A lens set with two filters attached in this manner, usually will not accept the standard Mamiya, front lens caps or hoods.

    An indexing method, similar to the method above, is employed for using polarizing filters on TLR's, too.
    You first attach the polarizer to the viewing lens, mark or tape the two rings of the polarizer at the desired effect, then carefully unscrew the polarizer from the upper lens and move it down to the taking lens. Click n'repeat as necessary!

  7. #7
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    .
    I recently bought a Lee Filter Holder { 4" ? } It's a device that clamps
    onto a lens using an Elastomeric Tension Device. I was thinking about
    using that on my Yashica D, being as Bay-30 filters are a bit expensive.
    Although I've haven't located any 4" Lee Filters as yet ...

    Ron
    .

  8. #8

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    M.A.
    Get yourself a Bay 1 - to standard screw-on filter converter.
    Available from any of the many, step-up/step-down filter ring, and filter suppliers.
    The common (IIRC) converted size for this purpose, converts to accept 52mm screw on filters.
    For a lens hood, acquire an inexpensive 52mm, screw on, rubber hood; $4-$6 USD, on-line.

    Very little, to no vignetting visible in the viewing lens with this set-up installed on the taking lens.
    The larger rubber hood will provide better glare/flare shielding then the Bay-1 hoods, and since at it's base of 52mm,
    this hood will not vignette on your film through the taking lens either.

    I step-up the lenses on my Mamiya TLR's to 52mm, and use easily available 52mm lens hoods there, too.

    Easier to use, cheaper, greater availability, and less destructive to the lenses,
    then using the poorly designed lens hoods from Mamiya.



 

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