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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Did you notice that the hole on one side of the spool is square?

    That works just as well as the keyway (winding groove) when engaged with the proper windup spool.

    PE
    Not in this camera, no. The winding key is too large for the square hole.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    If you can get some 116/616 backing paper or make it, 70mm bulk film can be rolled up pretty easily...
    An interesting idea, but I don't have gear to develop 70mm film, or usable spools...

  3. #13

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    Kodak old films

    I have the Kodak 3A autographic ,takes 122 film. Would the drywall anchor trick work on this too? Man its a beautful camera!~
    wanna build a glass cube for it, just put it on display!

  4. #14
    Ottrdaemmerung's Avatar
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    exwriter: If 122 (which I'm not familiar with) has a spool width wider than 120, then yes, it should.
    website | Flickr
    "Embrace the negative with absolution, your final positive reward." --IQ, "The Province," Frequency

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    "I don't have gear to develop 70mm film, or usable spools"

    I will outline how the inner MacGyver can be unleashed with this story of film fiddling.

    I was appalled at the price to buy some c-41 120 film locally a few years ago ($8.95 per roll for Kodak Portra 160NC at a Henry's, which is a big camera chain store around here).

    So I got on the *bay and won 100' of 70mm Portra 160NC. The goal was to cut the stuff down, and reload for a much better price (material cost was something lie $2 per 120 rool).
    I have been saving spools and backing paper for years, enough to keep an old otherwise empty 250 sheet 8x10 paper box full. The backing paper has been great for creating impromtu darkrooms from time to time. So I guess that is why I keep the stuff around, and the easiest way to save it is on the spool it came on.

    Well, it turns out that slitting is quite feasible and rerolling is possible, but I subsequently found a cache of 120 from a commenrcial photogrpaher for less than $2, and so the bulk roll languished in the freezer for a few years.

    Then this old Brownie, and an old Polaroid J66 came to me as a gift.

    The brownie works on 70mm almost perfectly, and the apertures and shutter work well exposing 100iso film outdoors in the summer.

    I made spools up from 35mm cassette spindles that were cut in half and had 'sitting in front of the TV whittling' hardwood dowels fashioned to make the spools extend to suit 70mm wide film.

    The end of spools did not suit the drive key. I got the hot glue gun out and loaded it with slow cooling funiture type glue sticks.

    I coated the drive key with a dab of vaseline, then loaded the just glued spindle end in alignmnet, and pushed the drive key in, and pulled it out again.

    I fixed up any distortions from the key's extraction with my x-acto knife on the still soft glue mass.

    I had no 70mm backing paper, so I load the 75 mm rolls only in the darkroom.

    I worked out how many turns of the winding key to fully advance the fim by loading the film spools with old 120 backing paper, and mark it up with markers with the back open

    For development I have a Paterson two piece reel and single tank centre spinde that I have adapted with rubber bands and self amalgamating tape to end up with a reel that is just far enough apart to suit the film.

    I place it uncut on a glassless 4x5 neg acrrier with one edge in the edge of the carrier. I stop down and the thing projects fine, compared to the crappy optical quality of the Brownie lens.

    The Polaroid was a more radical mod. I added a take up drive bolt to wind the film. It yields a better image by virtue of it's better lens, and have found instruction on the web of correlating the lightmeter settings to the aperture setting needed to give a balanced exposure witht he automatically adjusting shutter speed doing most of the correct exposure work.

    The 70mmx 4" negative from it is a fair bit more crisp than the Brownie, but the Polarod sold for a hunk more money in it's day than the Brwonie was a few decades earlier.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16

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    I was able to create a makeshift adapter by cutting a 120 spool in two and whittling it down so that I had the end flange with a bit of plastic that I could stick into the film takeup spool, and then it fit into the camera and I could wind it normally. The drywall trick pushes the spool towards the winding key, but this trick allowed me to push the film spool away from the winding key, towards the film counter window. The 6x4.5 numbers then showed up in the window, and I counted two numbers for each frame. (Too tight, the pictures overlapped. Counting 2.5 or 3 frames would be better.)

    The adapter looked a bit fragile, and indeed it broke just after I shot the last frame on the second roll. But now I have a better idea of what I need to make it work. A thin steel plate, a metal cutter and a bit of hammering and cursing in a workshop should get me something solid I can glue onto a 120 flange to make a complete adapter.

  7. #17

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    hi arctic amateur

    i also have a camera that takes 116 film ( and one that takes 122 )
    at first i was using a regular roll of 120 as the supply, and i found a 116 spool for the take-up
    then i just made cardboard "washers" that shimmed the 120 spool in the film-spots ... it worked fine.
    i have taken to spooling paper onto empty spools of 122 film and shooting paper negatives, and will probably
    do the same thing with the brownie ( 1A ) and the 116 spools. you just cut paper to the right size, tape the strips end to end
    and wind them all up on 1 spool "taped" for a few days ( and put it someplace dark ).
    try using cardboard washers / shims

    good luck !
    john
    ask me how ..

  8. #18

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    Speaking of modifying spools...

    I needed a 125 spool the other day, for a Seneca 3A Box Scout (which despite its name is in fact a 3B). No kidding. Same image size as 122, but wider spool. I'm not looking for adapters per se, as I'd rather shoot the right size film, even if I have to make it myself, than adapt it for 120.

    So I did this: I have a few extra 122 (and 118) spools. The wooden ones won't work for this mod, but the metal ones are OK.

    I clamped the jigsaw upside down in the vise (instant scroll-saw...) put the thin-metal cutting blade on, and sawed the spool in half.

    Then cut a 7/16" dowel, which is the exact ID of the spool (OD is 0.450" nominal), to the appropriate length. Cut a longitudinal slot in the dowel to match the slot in the spool (for this I had an old slotting cutter from a safe-deposit key-cutting machine, which I put in an arbor and chucked in a drill). Drilled round holes in both ends of the dowel, filed a keyslot over one of the holes, shoved the dowel into the two ends of the cut spool, checked the length and glued it in. Voila, a 125 spool...

    Mike: The older Patterson reels (the brown plastic ones) have a click-stop for 116, as do other plastic reels from that era. Developing 122 is more problematical, but I found one of those ancient developing tanks with the light proof apron.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 125spool.jpg  

  9. #19

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    I shot two rolls, and most of the pictures were underexposed but some came out all right. I guess I should have shot all the pictures on largest apterture. I counted 2x 6x4.5 when winding, which wasn't enough space, so I got overlapping negatives. I'll try 3x next roll, when I manage to build another adapter.



    (Boy does that Shanghai film curl! I'll spend a little extra on film next time.)

  10. #20
    Dan Quan's Avatar
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    I found these links on the interwebs:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/radioripster/3968400219/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/radioripster/3969174730/

    http://filmspooler.wordpress.com/201...rownie-junior/


    If all goes according to plan I'm trying it for the first time tonight in a Kodak Vigilant Six 16 with ~ a 2 1/2 x 4 1/4 neg area. Apparently the drywall anchors are color coded to different sizes. I did not know that. Anyway, I'm stoked.
    DanQuan.com
    stand in the place where you are

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