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  1. #21
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Have you ever used a rangefinder before? If not, that may be something you'd want to try first before diving right into it. I know they are certainly not for everyone, and are absolutely different from the SLR Hassy. The Hassy is the more versatile camera, by far. Telephoto, close-ups, viewing though the lens, precise framing... all things you can't do with rangefinders.

    But for me, I love MF rangefinders. That's all I shoot. I would say certainly look at the Mamiya 7 if you want to shoot 6x7 or the Mamiya 6, which I shoot, if you want to stick with 6x6. While the Mamiya RF's are expensive used, they are still cheaper than a new Fuji. Though as mentioned above, being able to shoot both 6x6 and 6x7 with one camera is sweet, and the camera does fold up as well which is cool. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

  2. #22
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Have you ever used a rangefinder before? If not, that may be something you'd want to try first before diving right into it. I know they are certainly not for everyone, and are absolutely different from the SLR Hassy. The Hassy is the more versatile camera, by far. Telephoto, close-ups, viewing though the lens, precise framing... all things you can't do with rangefinders.

    But for me, I love MF rangefinders. That's all I shoot. I would say certainly look at the Mamiya 7 if you want to shoot 6x7 or the Mamiya 6, which I shoot, if you want to stick with 6x6. While the Mamiya RF's are expensive used, they are still cheaper than a new Fuji. Though as mentioned above, being able to shoot both 6x6 and 6x7 with one camera is sweet, and the camera does fold up as well which is cool. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

    Rangefinders are very cool. I'm a happy Leica M2 user (besides the Hassy), far from the size of the Fuji or the Mamiya 6 or 7.

    I just love the 6x6 and above size neg. I could just resign myself to being the old guy pushed down the hall of the nursing home in a wheel chair snapping shots with the M2, but Oh Hell No. I'd rather tumble off a mountain after getting that great shot that the newspapers and magazines would publish once finding my camera still on the tripod on the mountain as the last masterpiece captured on 6x6 by the obscure but extremely talented photographer names Lee.

    OK that was a little off topic.

    Your right about decisions, decisions. So, to keep up my health the best I can I'll do my work out after work and shoot some shots this weekend with what I have as I ponder what to do to lighten the EQ load.

    Lee

  3. #23
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by segedi View Post
    I need a wide for my Hassy... so if you decide to part with one, PM me!

    And I do agree with keeping some of the hassy system. The weight difference of a 500 series + A12 + 80mm is just over a pound. That pound may add up over a good trek, but you can get lighter boots : )
    PM on the way

  4. #24

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    Rollei 3.5F weighs 2lb. 9oz.

  5. #25

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    I have a fairly nice Pentax 645N system, with 9 lenses. I love the system. Having few opportunities for trekking, if any, and finding the camera with 3 lenses already heavy for a daily carry when working (so not using a backpack), I bought a Plaubel Makina 67 with the Nikkor 2.8/80mm. Ever since, I'm shooting more, always taking the Plaubel along wherever I go. I had to get used to focusing, but sort of like the different method of framing, and adore the detail I get out of it on 6x7.
    My only real regret is that it's not for portraits (and I don't think the Mamiya 6 and 7 are, either). But then, I have a system that really is (Pentax 645N with either 135 or 150mm). The Mamiya 7 has a reputation for sharpness that is apparently unbeatable. If weight is a concern, every ounce counts. I'd go for the Mamiya if I wanted more lenses. If only one, you have more choice.

  6. #26
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troll View Post
    I have a fairly nice Pentax 645N system, with 9 lenses. I love the system. Having few opportunities for trekking, if any, and finding the camera with 3 lenses already heavy for a daily carry when working (so not using a backpack), I bought a Plaubel Makina 67 with the Nikkor 2.8/80mm. Ever since, I'm shooting more, always taking the Plaubel along wherever I go. I had to get used to focusing, but sort of like the different method of framing, and adore the detail I get out of it on 6x7.
    My only real regret is that it's not for portraits (and I don't think the Mamiya 6 and 7 are, either). But then, I have a system that really is (Pentax 645N with either 135 or 150mm). The Mamiya 7 has a reputation for sharpness that is apparently unbeatable. If weight is a concern, every ounce counts. I'd go for the Mamiya if I wanted more lenses. If only one, you have more choice.
    That is a very cool camera. I had to look it up since I have not seen one before. The idea of a compact 120 just sounds exciting

  7. #27
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    I saw a movie about the great photographer Keith Carter. He had his Hassy with his 80mm and said something to the effect of "I've made almost all of my photographs with this camera." In Twyla Tharp's book "The Creative Habit" she talks about how constraints actually enhance your creativity, rather that limit them. So go light! Take the Hassy and the 80, or the Makro and let that be that. You'll be surprised how very rarely you'll say "dang, I wish I'd have brought the 150!") Like almost never.

    Case in point from my personal experience: I use only long-normal lenses, so the 127mm on the Mamiya, and the 110mm Macro on the Bronica SQ, which if you do the math are basically the exact same focal length. (One exception to this rule, but a very tiny one.) Since I read Twyla's book and "constrained" myself, my work has gotten much clearer and more focused. I highly recommend it.

    You'll find too that one lens helps give your images an optical consistency, so they fit together better on the wall.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  8. #28

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    I'm going through the same process as you and first found that by recording what I used in the field helped. I then decided to see how far I could strip my camera down and still find it useful. Traded the metered prism first for a nonmetered prism the, just the waist level finder, skipped the speedgrip, then moved from the 40mm to 40mm lens as it is a few onces lighter and then back to the 40 as I liked it better. Then stopped carrying multiple backs loaded with the same emulsion and moved to a lighter tripod. Learned to shot with the one lens and let my feet do the walking. It helped quite a bit but still heavey for me as I've lost more than half my body weight and a lot of muscle tone. I finally started to pack the Rolleiflex T as it was lighter and finally realized none of this was going to be the answer down the line so I set it all aside and now I just pack my Leica CL with the 40 and 90mm lenses. The lightest weight and highest quality combination I am sure I will be able to carry in the long run. Also, allows me to use a much light Gitzo tripod that I have.

  9. #29

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    I have to confess that I havn't read all the posts (I am in the middle of cooking supper) But I would suggest a Fuji GW690. It is huge, but really good to handle, the negs are likewise huge. the only drawback is the film loading, it is horrible but I am prepared to put up with that for the good results.

  10. #30
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Lee, I have the GF670 and it's really a great camera..6x6 and 6x7.. Evan Clarke

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