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  1. #1
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Off my Hasselblad System for a Fujifilm GF670 Rangefinder?

    I love my Hasselblad system, never could afford such precision equipment for years until they came up second and even third hand suffering the whip of the Digital Revolution in photography. The quagmire is that as I age and also come to grips with my heart conditions trekking through the woods and mountains with the Hassy system is getting a bit, shall I say adventurous. So should I sell it all and go to a Fuji GF670?

    The last few treks I have taken I have rarely changed lenses (40, 50, 80, 120 and 150mm lenses) and if I am truthful I have taken most of my images with the 80mm prime anyway. So I often only carry the 50mm and the 80 stays mounted, the rest in the car at the trail head.

    Pros: The GF670 is lighter, has a meter, looks cool, gets nice reviews and above all packs easy. I’m a Leica M lover too so that has an attraction to me.

    Cons: The GF670 has a dependence on a battery for the shutter. Will they keep making CR2 batteries for years? (Hell it’s not a Hassy) Never heard any reviews about cold weather performance yet of the GF670

    So let me hear your feedback. Would you consider such a move? Any experience with the Fuji camera? Love your folder you have, whatever model, got some real trekking successes with it that might make me jump for joy and pull the trigger?

    Lee

  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I have only used 645 models of the Fuji lineup. My impression is that they make extremely high quality cameras that last, with amazing lenses, they are very user friendly, logical to use, and seem to generally be a great choice.

    Other than that, the Mamiya rangefinders are very well received too. Mamiya 6 or 7 are fantastic cameras but heavier than their Fuji counterparts.

    Sorry the Hasselblad system is getting too cumbersome for you. At least you got the chance to enjoy one. I'm sure that with a lighter fine camera, such as the Fuji or Mamiya types, you'll have something that will allow you equal quality and more enjoyment.

    Sorry I don't have a more direct answer for you.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #3
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I wouldn't but I'm biased to the punchy Zeiss glass.

    Also, if you ever like to do closer work the Hasselblad w/tubes or one of the superb makro lenes Zeiss offers for this system is hard to beat.

    I guess it boils down to weight and if you do closeup.
    I'm not sure what a 67o outfit weighs but I'm betting its a bit lighter in the field.

  4. #4

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    I have a decent Hasselblad system as well and when traveling I take two bodies and my 50, 150 and 2x. When traveling by car locally I do as you do and carry what I think I will use and leave the rest ( 250 and 350 ) locked in the trunk. If the trek isn't to be too long I take my larger tripod but when traveling or planning a lot of walking I take my carbon-fiber tripod. I carry the cameras in a camera back pack which makes things easy. I'm no youngster but I'm in very good physical condition.

    That said, I think depending on the subjects you like to photograph the Hasselblad may be more versatile especially if you also want to do still life at home or portraits.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5
    Frank C's Avatar
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    To me the key ingredient to your question is "heart condition", I would hate to give up a nice Hasselblad system, however if I had concerns as to my health I would opt for something that I felt would be better for my health under the circumstances. If the Fuji would enable you to get out and enjoy photography to the fullest, then thats what I would do.

  6. #6
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    Why not have both? Keep the Hassie for non-trek photos, and use the Fuji for hiking.

  7. #7
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    Why not have both? Keep the Hassie for non-trek photos, and use the Fuji for hiking.
    To be honest the money and the reality that I do not shelp things up and down hills as good as I used to. I have begun thinking I could keep the 500 C/M and off the 40mm, 2 backs, ELM, the 150mm, and the metered prisim and raise enough cash and leave me wiht the 80mm one back and the C/M plus the 120 Makro (great lens).

    This might be a good way to reach both objectives. I just really look forward to a more compact camera this winter and future hikes. My last hike was a bit of an eye opener as to how I am not the kid in the kids body anymore, now I am just the kid in the old man's body. But the kid now has to justify his toys.

  8. #8
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    ^that is precisely what I would do.

  9. #9

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    I love my 6x6 system just like you do (not a Hassy, though) so in order to hike with it I radically cut down on photobags/tripod etc. but, more importantly, on non-photo gear. Fewer things, smaller, only lightweight versions, sharply calculated food/drink, multifunctional items. Now I hike lighter than back in the days of my hikes with the small format system!
    Regular exercise and enough sleep, help too...
    Best, Pete

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I would keep the Hassy 40mm and 120mm lenses - because they offer something significantly different when compared to the GF670.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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