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Thread: 6x6 trouble

  1. #11
    Ottrdaemmerung's Avatar
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    Well, you know what large-format photographers say about composing on ground glass: if the composition seems to aesthetically work upside-down, then it will work rightside up too. Of course if you're shooting square format like 6x6, you suddenly have four orientation choices instead of two. The composition should work any of four ways. So why not print and display your images completely randomly? By all means flip a coin (or two) to let the prevailing artistic spirits decide.

    If a viewer gets puzzled by the results, simply turn up your nose, declaim with righteous indignation that they obviously know nothing about true art, and move on to someone more appreciative.
    website | Flickr
    "Embrace the negative with absolution, your final positive reward." --IQ, "The Province," Frequency

  2. #12

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    Take your pocket knife and carve a large arrow on all your lenses. The arrow on the negative will tell you the direction. Satisfaction guaranteed!
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  3. #13
    MDR
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    Just out of curiousity what are you photographing if it's abstracts it doesn't matter which side is up. The writing on the paper or the edge markings on the negative should be able to help you figure out which side is up.

    Dominik

  4. #14
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltereegho View Post
    Take your pocket knife and carve a large arrow on all your lenses. The arrow on the negative will tell you the direction. Satisfaction guaranteed!
    Well, first, I would use a Sharpie marker to make the arrow. What if you used a different camera that wasn't broken? Then you would have to remember that the arrow is pointing the wrong way.

    Also, don't forget that making the arrow on the glass that is in front of the nodal point of the lens will make it upside down but, if you mark in on the glass that's behind the nodal point it will be right side up.

    Always remember: Upside down is really right side up and left is always right except when right is really right... which means that upside down is really upside down and upright is really right side up.

    If you don't remember, you're likely to get everything bass ackwards and upside wrong!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #15
    lxdude's Avatar
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    If left is right then right is all that's left.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #16
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Unless you get it wrong. Then you never can be sure whether right is wrong or left is right.

    I usually just wright it down.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #17
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Right.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #18

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    Before you shoot a frame, pop the back in bright sunshine, and mark the middle of the film with a Sharpie. Put a large V for vertical and H for horizontal. Then replace the back, take your shot, and advance the film.

    I suspect you have stored your camera on its side and the glass has flowed over time to one side of the lens mount to the other, making vertical and horizontal difficult to identify...

    Isn't this question 7 months late, John?

    Richard

  9. #19

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    i thought about etching or writing on the lens with a marker
    but im kind fo sydlecix too and it might confuse me even more
    especially if the ground glass is broken too ...
    i even thought of writing on the ground glass so i would know
    but unfortunately after the 2nd or 3rd roll, i realized the marker
    didn't appear on the negative
    i tried writing on the film before each shot too ..
    but all my shots came out white/ negatives black ...
    maybe its my developer ?

    i never had this trouble
    when i used a yashica 124G, or a mamiya 6iv
    so i thought getting a rolleicord would be a piece of cake ...


    i hopethe the adapter / accessory bdial mentioned
    won't cost more than i paid for the camera ...

    thanks for your help .
    i'm starting to think i got a hassle-bad instead of a rolleichord

  10. #20
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    John:

    My motto is:

    "Now, if 6 turned up to be 9,
    I don't mind, I don't mind."

    "Sing on brother,
    Play on brother . . ."
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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