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  1. #11
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant
    If you can find a C33 or C330 they are very much better (ease of use only) than the C220's.
    There are far more C330 about than C220 and they don't really fetch what they are worth secondhand.
    Ian,
    I've been looking at the C220s and C330s, and for what I'm looking for, the price differential between the two doesn't really justify the C330. My understanding is that if one is a serious professional photographer, the C330 is the only way to go because it is faster to use. For my intentions, which would be landscape and family portraiture, I think that the C220 would be better. On eBay, at least, the C330s are going for considerably more than the C220s.

    Whadderyall think?
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  2. #12
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    As you say the C220 is cheaper, but slower to use. Accessories are the same for both variant, but some slight differences in the latest "f" and "s" variants. I have a 330 with three lens and the odds and ends, and I woudn't want to carry it too far. So it's your choice - versatility or portability. With regard to image quality there is noth to chose between them.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  3. #13

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    Trade-offs, trade-offs. If you want an inexpensive 6x6 system camera, the Mamiya TLR will work. The weight issue is a bit misleading - the TLR bodies are heavier, but the lenses lighter than comparable SLR items.

    Try http://www.macuserforums.com/WebX?38...iTF.0@.ee6b280 for the US Mamiya Forum. The Mamiya US site (http://www.mamiya.com ) needs Internet Explorer to navigate, so it can be hard to find the forum!

    I have some weight comparisons, plus some other useful information at http://www.btinternet.com/~g.a.patte...faq/m_faq.html

  4. #14

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    Like all things it really comes down to how your going to use it and which suits your personal style better.

    The Mamiya is a more flexible tool that can accomplish a greater range of photographic tasks but the Rollei truly shines at photographing people.

    The lack of interchangeable lenses is a limitation on the Rollei, but it keeps me focused on the shooting and from messing about with my gear.

    Size: I've always been impressed with the Mamiya's but just found them too big for toting around casually. Both of the attached shots wouldn't have happened if I owned a Mamiya TLR instead of a Rollei... Cause I would have left it at home that day!

    and of course.. people just like my RolleiCord. It almost never fails to impress.

    I hope this helps in your decision,
    Ian
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails henri3_500.jpg  

  5. #15
    Neil Souch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max Power
    Neil,
    This is a really good point...Right now, I'm used to lugging about my X-700 and 3 lenses, a flash, a light-meter and my Kodak Guide...I tend to travel heavy because I don't want to be caught out. I'm not really worried about weight to be honest. I'm looking for a reasonable MF setup at a reasonable price...I'm not really interested in a cult camera.

    Thanks,
    Kent
    Kent,

    I would go for the Mamiya as you will get super quality + versility at affordable prices. I progressed from fixed lens TLRs to the Mamiya TLRs for those very reasons. I mentioned the weight as if you want to shoot colour and mono you will need a two body + a few lenses outfit (eventually). Also I found a heivier tripod was needed for the Mamiyas whereas I could get away with a lighter tripod with the smaller TLRs. Weight is more of an issue for me these days as I am now 60+ and although still quite active I do watch what I carry on my back! If you decide on the Mamiya I would recommend you try to handle one before buying to make sure you like the handling etc. I found the Mamiyas a joy to own and use, they slow you down and make you think about composition and metering. And that can't be a bad thing!

    All the best,

    Neil.

  6. #16
    Max Power's Avatar
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    First off, I just want to thank everyone for pitching in and giving me your opinons. It really helps to have people around who understand my questions and POV.

    Ian: Those photos are brilliant...The lenses are amazing.

    Graham: I'm really glad that you threw in your comments; I've looked at your site and found it really useful. Cheers mate!

    Neil: Good point. There is a shop in town that I go to very often for darkroom supplies. They are starting to get to know me as the Ilford nut They have a couple of used C220s and C330s on hand and I think that I will ask to rent one for a day to see what I think.

    I raise my glass to all of you!

    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  7. #17

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    There are a couple of web sites that deal extensively with Mamiya TLRs. I don't remeber the urls but one of them listed things to look at when buying a used mamiya. One thing to keep in mide is that Mamiyas where the cameras of choice for many years for portraits and weddings, so many of the used cameras have seen heavy use. Of course one of the reasons they were used so much was there amazing durability.

    An advantage with the Mamiyas is that if you need work done, almost any camera repair shop will have experience and parts on hand. Also if you do accumulate a set of lenses it is not a huge outlay to have to buy another body if the original breaks and repairs are more then a replacement camera.

    I have used the 220 and they are great cameras for the kind of use you plan. And as others have pointed out, there is a huge amount of accessories out there for both 220 and 330s.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #18
    Brac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max Power
    Ian,
    I've been looking at the C220s and C330s, and for what I'm looking for, the price differential between the two doesn't really justify the C330. My understanding is that if one is a serious professional photographer, the C330 is the only way to go because it is faster to use. For my intentions, which would be landscape and family portraiture, I think that the C220 would be better. On eBay, at least, the C330s are going for considerably more than the C220s.

    Whadderyall think?
    I'm sure the C220 will do what you want fine. I used to do a lot of B&W photography for a group which was restoring a disused canal - they wanted photos for their magazine (in those days it was not in colour) plus 10 x 8's for display stands. The big negs made producing prints that size very easy plus there was no need to take a lens longer than the 80mm because the neg size allowed you to enlarge just part of it if you wanted.

    As far as weight is concerned, doing this photography often involved tramping for miles and I never found it a problem. All I needed was camera body & WL finder, 80mm & 55mm lens sets, exposure meter and most important the Mamiya grip holder plus holdall & film. A lot less heavy than some 35mm SLR outfits. The lens sets apart from the telephotos each weigh less than 350g (just checked it with an old Mamiya brochure!)

    For portraits the 80mm can cope but the 135mm tele is better.

    At the end of the day any well made TLR is more robust than a MF SLR (no moving mirror etc) & is ideal for outdoor use.

  9. #19

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    FWIW, I have a C220 with 2 lenses (65 and 180), and find that I can comfortably hike with that outfit + a 3021 tripod for most of the day, even in Colorado or Utah where the elevation is 5000+ ft higher than my normal altitude. The only downsides I've run into are that it's not the fastest thing to focus, and when doing extreme closeups you have to remember both to correct for the parallax, and to make sure the camera is centered over the axis you'll move it to correct (obvious, but I have a few fuzzy closeups from forgetting where the taking and viewing lens nodal points were). there are bright lines in the standard viewfinder that you can use to guess.

    Also not mentioned is that while they natively prevent you from doing double exposures, there's a switch on the side to allow the shutter to be cocked without moving the film, just in case you actually want a multiple exposure.

    Personally, I like mine a lot, but I had had a TLR in HS and college, so it was a more capable version of a camera style that I'd already had a few years of experience with. Try to rent/borrow one, and see if it fits your style of shooting before making too big of a committment.

  10. #20

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    Max, I think it is wise to try out the cameras first. I'm surprised so many people commented on the weight of a Mamiya TLR system. While I find using it handheld to be clumsy due to the size and apparent topheaviness of the C330, I've never been bothered by the weight of the camera. I have a C330 with 55, 80 and 135 lenses and the bag with this system plus film, filters and extras is really lightweight to this overweight, middle-aged photographer with a bad back and neck.

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