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  1. #11

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    Not to go off topic but why not get a camera that might be easier to use such as a tlr or rangefinder. I used to use a mf slr but finally decided it was easier and yielded more usable results when I switched to a rangerfinder. I opted for a 35mm as I owned it but could have just as easily gone for a mf rangefinder. I did use to have fun going out with a couple of bakelite mf box cameras with only the instant shutter speed and a couple of aperature settings. The lenses are somewhat soft giving some interesting and nice images much unlike the ones from the likes of new cameras.

  2. #12
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianL View Post
    Not to go off topic but why not get a camera that might be easier to use such as a tlr or rangefinder. I used to use a mf slr but finally decided it was easier and yielded more usable results when I switched to a rangerfinder. I opted for a 35mm as I owned it but could have just as easily gone for a mf rangefinder. I did use to have fun going out with a couple of bakelite mf box cameras with only the instant shutter speed and a couple of aperature settings. The lenses are somewhat soft giving some interesting and nice images much unlike the ones from the likes of new cameras.
    That would be too easy.

    Besides, rangefinders suck!

  3. #13

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    I find shooting on-the-fly not so difficult because I use a 6x6 format and everything has been determine before hand. I take notes of of my surrounding area; exposure reading and pre focus on predetermine land marks; this can change even if have covered all your bases. I would leave the monopod home. I use a tripod which also serves as a monopod as well; keep all the legs together; pick the height you want and just adjust the column. A carbon fiber tripod is the way to go. I use a Arcatech ball head; ISO 400/800; try to keep my aperture at f8 and shutter speed at 1/125, 1250 or 1/500.

    http://acratech.net/

    http://www.indurogear.com/products_d...414.html#specs

    http://siruicanada.com/tripods/n2205.htm

    http://siruicanada.com/tripods/n2204.htm


    Good luck

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post

    Re: C-B's technique. Film footage of him at work might change your mind, Dan. He just as often stalked and pounced on shots. Here he is in action:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqsOY...eature=related
    Well, compared to Bruce Gilden, Cartier-Bresson is calm and a gentleman in his most 'pounce-y' shooting! I see a whole range in how he was shooting, and of course when making a film, the tendency will be to edit for action, not someone simply standing quietly. The standing at a scene and waiting for people to fall into place is one technique C-B mentions among others. But all in all, a 35mm allows for more options, for quicker changes, for faster adjustments and for true pouncing, while an RB67 will simply be slower.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRBARi09je8
    Last edited by Dan Daniel; 11-25-2011 at 12:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I'd second the notion of thinking about a MF rangefinder. I actually used a Bronica SQAi for what was basically street photography in China, on past trips..although that is somewhat lighter than an RZ.

    Consider the excellent Mamiya 7 or 6 - still razor sharp lenses in an easier to handle package. I mention this because prefocusing on a tripod is practical but you certainly sacrifice mobility and spontaneity - two attributes I think pretty much define street photography.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  6. #16

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    I usally use my Rolleiflex for street photography which I haven't done recently. I use my RB67 for landscapes, etc.

    Jeff

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