Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,921   Posts: 1,584,941   Online: 1066
      
Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 90
  1. #41

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    563
    Part 1 of the following might be helpful. Ignore the second cut-away image's second lower eyeball; the lower viewing system is exclusive to Rolleiflex-
    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/rollei/..._automatic.htm

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    186
    Thanks Dan and lxdude, really appreciate any and all help.

    I still have to read a bit more about the Minolta Autocord but from what I've read, it does sound like a cool camera, hence it being my 2nd choice currently. I don't like the idea of buying an Autocord and then sending it to Mr. Bryan for it to be perfected. The result may be awesome, but this just seems very time consuming and complicated (especially when I keep hearing about how simple loading/rewinding is more of a pain). This may be rather lofty, but I kinda want it to just work properly and be in a good condition so that it'll last right out of the box, like my 35mm cameras.

    I'll read more into it, but I'd still love to hear people's experiences with Yashica's really limited shutter speeds that I was talking about earlier. 1/500th just isn't fast enough for low f-stops in sunny light. Hell, 1/4000th is hardly enough for f/5.6 (which I would barely consider low f-stop). I'm guessing this is similar with all TLRs, but I will research specifically for models such as the Autocord. Oh, and there's the 120 developing.

    Anyways, thanks again for the info and links. That butkus one looks like it'll be informative, I'll get to reading it shortly.

  3. #43
    agfarapid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    183
    Images
    8
    1/500th just isn't fast enough for low f-stops in sunny light. Hell, 1/4000th is hardly enough for f/5.6 (which I would barely consider low f-stop).
    If you are coming in from the digital world, shutter speeds of 1/8,000s and ISO's to 4000, shutter speeds of 1/500 sec. and max ISO of 400 might seem very limiting. However in the days of film, your max ISO was usually 400, coupled with apertures down to f64 so it was and is fairly easy to accommodate bright sun on the beach (just don't bring Delta 3200 !). I've been shooting M/F for quite a few years and I can't remember when last I had an exposure problem like that.

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    186
    I've never used 1/8000th a second before. Both my 35mm SLR and DSLR go up to 1/4000th. On film, I've yet to go above ISO 400, but I didn't know you couldn't do ISO 800 on a TLR, thanks. I always assumed you can always bump up the f stop to a smaller aperture like f/11 or f/22 or f/64 or what have you, as you say, but I like shallow depth of field, so unless things are really different with a TLR, I'm not going to get that above f/7.1. Maybe I would just need to get used to less shallow depth of field.

  5. #45
    ColdEye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    733
    Images
    50
    Iso 400 speed film with a max shutter speed of 1/500 is not that limiting at least for me. You can always rate it to 200 and change your dev times accordingly. Dont be afraid to use f8 or f11.

  6. #46
    ColdEye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    733
    Images
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Daniel View Post
    Get an Autocord. Send it to Karl Bryan who will overhaul it, clean it up, get it working smoothly. And then go shoot for the next ten years or so. For real fun, scab a Hasselblad NC-2 prism on top. This shows a Yahsica-Mat with the prism, but the prism is now on an Autocord. The lever focusing on the Autocord is very quick and responsive, and the prism gives a corrected view-



    The first 36 of the first group and all of the second group were shot with this setup-
    http://dandaniel.zenfolio.com/p92646000
    http://dandaniel.zenfolio.com/p311823083

    A shutter release has a feel. A good release will have a bit of loose travel, a bit of resistance, and at some consistent point the shutter fires. After you use a camera a bit, you get a handle on just where the actual release moment is in the travel, what it feels like, etc. Both TLR and rangefinder cameras have no mirror black-out. Neither do view cameras. Or Brownies and folders. And most Polaroids.
    Wow, can I also put a prism on a Yashica D??

  7. #47
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,950
    Images
    60
    h.v.:

    More and more I think you need to find someone who can actually show you a medium format camera in action, because with even a little bit of hands-on context, I think almost all of the answers to your questions would be obvious to you.

    I bet 15 minutes would do it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #48
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,211
    You hadn't said so much about not being able to afford the advertised 124G at the time I posted.

    The shutter speeds I've never found limiting. In practice I carry several rolls of film of different speeds. With medium speed 100-125 film the 1/500th maximum can get you wide apertures in all but the brightest light. Black and white film is fine to expose at one stop slower than box speed and color neg. even more so. You can go slower with something like Pan F if you want. It's never really a problem. Remember too you only have 12 shots on a roll so it's less limiting to shoot an entire roll in given light and then load the next roll for whatever light you face then.

    You aren't limited to ISO 400, that's just the max. speed the internal meter can meter for. You can set it to 400, meter, then set one less stop exposure for 800, two stops for 1600 etc. (Or if you need 640 set it to 320 and set one stop less etc.) plus the calculators on hand held meters usually cover a wide range of effective film speeds. I routinely shoot Delta 3200 at 3200 in my Yashica, metering with my hand held meter.

    And what Matt said: You need to see some of this stuff IRL, and you also need to read some. If you were interested in large format I could recommend books, but I don't know of any "intro to medium format" books, and even less so for those coming from digital.

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    186
    I know that ISO 400 is just the max. because that's what agfarapid said. Also I'm not "coming from digital," I'm "coming from 35mm." I've said that I have a DSLR and do shoot digital, as I'm sure many do, but it's not like that's all I do and on a film forum I would think I would be considered a 35mm shooter, not a digital shooter, just like it says in my description. I agree, however, that looking at one of these and playing with it in real life would be a big help. Unfortunately, I know of no such place or person that I could do that at/with. The only place I've seen a TLR locally is behind glass, preserved in a museum-esque state at a local camera shop, and that's just Rollei and Ricoh, not Yashica and Minolta.

  10. #50
    lesm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    h.v.:

    More and more I think you need to find someone who can actually show you a medium format camera in action, because with even a little bit of hands-on context, I think almost all of the answers to your questions would be obvious to you.

    I bet 15 minutes would do it.
    This is sage advice. When you're entering a new field like this it's very easy to get too much information, ask too many questions and end up thrashing around with no satisfactory outcome. To be honest, when you talk about wanting a perfect MF camera which you won't need to get serviced for 10 years but you only have a tiny budget it seems to me you're headed for disappointment. You might get lucky, but any of the experienced members here will tell you that's unlikely. Before you spend any money at all, I'd strongly urge you to follow Matt's advice. Look for a camera club, make friends at your local art school, talk to an art teacher from your local high school, ask at your local camera store, just do whatever it takes to find someone to help you with some hands-on experience. And if you have a decent library, ask them to get you some books on interloan, such as Michael Freeman's "Cameras and Lenses," which has a ton of information and lots of illustrations. Librarians are knowledgeable and usually really willing to help.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin