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  1. #1
    Stuggi's Avatar
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    What 500-series Hasselblad for a newbie?

    I've always been interested in getting a series 500 Hasselblad, but I'm at a bit of a loss as to what model to get. I'm currently looking at getting a good body for starters, and then start looking for all the other accessories.
    What I've found locally at a good price are the following, 500 C/M without anything with a couple of dings, and a 500 EL/M with a waist finder (not sure if it's the correct term, but anyhow, it's the version you look down into) in a bit better shape for a little bit less.
    What I've found out so far is that the EL/M is a bit heavier due to the motorfeed, batteries can't be found for it, so you have to use an adapter. But it also doesn't suffer from jamming as the non-motor version does since the motor cocks the shutter every time.

    SO, basically, what should I get, are my two choices good or should I be looking for something completely different? I don't do studio shots, most (if not all) of my photography is done outdoors, but seldom in any setting where weight is a problem, as long as it isn't more than what a normal DSLR and a couple of lenses weigh.

    And then there's the accessories, I've understood that I'm gonna need a lens, finder and film back, but for the finder and lens I'm at a bit of a loss. Is there anything in particular I should also get or be on the lookout for? I don't mind spending time putting this setup together, since I'm not quite bathing in money at the moment.
    Canon F1n / FTb / AE-1P | Yashica Mat-124G | Hasselblad 500C/M | Leica IIIf

  2. #2
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    If you are looking for a hasselblad set up i would probably go with the 500cm, WLF (waist level finder), or a prism finder, a12 back, and a 80cf lens.

    For the finder. I prefer using the WLF as that is they way that i like to work. If you like looking into a view finder, i would go with the NC2. It is a very basic 45 degree finder.

    The 80 lens is the normal lens on a 6x6 camera. So if you like shooting a 50 on 35mm format, the 80 is for you. If you like shooting longer or wider then normal you still have a lot of choices in lens. Like the 50 for a wide and a 150 for a longer.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    If you are looking for a hasselblad set up i would probably go with the 500cm, WLF (waist level finder), or a prism finder, a12 back, and a 80cf lens.
    I agree. I've got a 500cm Classic with a 80mm CF lens, and I love it. I find the newer CF (or CFe etc) lenses are easier to use than the older c (chrome) c* (black) lenses. The waist level finder is an awesome tool also, see if you can get one with a newer focusing screen like an Acute Matte screen. They're brighter and easier to use than the older ones.

  4. #4
    Stuggi's Avatar
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    Okay, oddly, this is what I've been looking at. I'm currently deciding between a 80mm f2.8 C Planar T* and a 50mm F4 Distagon C T*, the 80mm is a bit more expensive, but I'm not sure if stepping down to f4 is a good idea just to save about 50€.
    Canon F1n / FTb / AE-1P | Yashica Mat-124G | Hasselblad 500C/M | Leica IIIf

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    A 50mm lens for a Hasselblad is quite wide - not too many would use one as a "standard" lens.

    And f/4 is quite fast for a 50mm lens (for 6x6)
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    I have a 50 for mine and I literally have used it once. I use the 80 for almost everything.

  7. #7
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    Thats my style though.

  8. #8

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    I used the 80, 50 and 150 and found I used them all nearly equally - the 150 for portraits, the 50 for architecture, landscapes and some environmental portraits and the 80 for full body portraits. There are some wonderful deals on some of this stuff currently.

    I still can't believe that I sold my Hasselblad stuff to finance a D1x about 8 years ago. The D1x is sitting unused in a bag. That never happened with the Hasselblad.

  9. #9

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    I am happy with the 500 c/m I bought a couple of years ago. Previously I borrowed one that my wife sort of shares with another poster on this list. It is prone to jamming as the camera needs work. It is a matter of carrying a stubby screwdriver in the camera bag. I did not like the 50mm and bought a 60 CF as my wide angle lens whereas my wife has the 50 on most of the time.

    It seems to me that the 500 c/m is not only dependable but is noticeably less expensive than the newer models. Lots of us are using them with no problem,there is a reason that I can not go into here to not repair the one that jams but it most likely is a moderate cost to have it serviced. Go for it as there are really great cameras.

  10. #10

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    A 500 cm with dings? Stay away - there are a lot 500cm in a good shape! What budget do you have? If you want a reliable - then get one from a shop with warranty. For a first setup you should get a 500 cm and not only a "C" and not a 500 Elm or some of the other motorized Hasselblads. (and of cource you can still buy the big Hasselblad batteries) - outdoors its much nicer to work without a motor - and you can go out in cold weather without the camera failing. A 500 ElM for me is too heavy - I use mine mostly indoors. And a 50 as a Standardlens is also very inconvenient - if you want to get hocked with the great system - buy a 500cm with WLF, back and 80 - and if you can get a CF as a lens - that would be it. Be sure, that you can return the camera - 8 out of my 10 backs I bought used had issues that needed repair! Try the lens - look against strong light if the lens is clear - and then try the long times if they work (the other times should work too, of cource) - get an optech strap for Hasselblad if you shout outside for convenience. A Hasselbald is a great camera. I love the images but going outside - for me its too heavy - but I'm getting old too. I sell my 500 cm but keep my 500 ELX for indoor shouting, wouldn't want to miss it at the whole.
    Keep patient - don't buy the first one you see!!! If you are not bathing in money you might want to wait a little - a beaten up Hasselbald is cheap and easy to find but often not a delight to use. You have to calculate some repair if you go with old stuff - and a Hassy is not as easy to be repaired as other cameras might be. If you have about 700 - 900 Euros - then you will have a good chance, if not: wait and save money!!!

    Good luck - Frank

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