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  1. #11
    Alan W's Avatar
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    Don't forget that you can also get a 6x6 back for the camera and thereby save yourself the trouble of buying a c330.I thought I'd never want to get rid of my beautiful c330 s which I had a long time before I had a 6x7 camera,now I'm considering selling my c330s.And so it goes....

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Havoc View Post
    Out of interest which Mamiya RZ67 lenses would you say are "the must haves" ? I'll be looking to add a couple of lenses at least in the coming year.
    Depends how you shoot. If wide, pick the 65 L/A or the 50 ULD depending how wide you want. Both are effectively perfect and will outresolve whatever film you use them with.

    If long, try one of the APO lenses, depending how long you need. 210, 250, 350, or 500. Again, basically perfect lenses, some say on par with the multi-thousand dollar superachromats from Hasselblad.

    Heard great things about the 140 macro as well but I don't have personal experience with that one.

  3. #13

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    A really sturdy tripod is the most essential accessory, with cable release.

    As for lenses, I have 110, 65, and 50, and have just acquired a 250. My main use is for landscapes. I can carry them all and the tripod, but if I wanted to cut weight and just take two lenses, it would be 110 and 50. If I could only take one lens, it would be the 65mm.

    I have one image with the 50mm (not the ULD version) which shows a lot of distortion at the edge, but need to shoot some more before drawing conclusions.

  4. #14
    Havoc's Avatar
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    Which cable release would you recommend for the RZ67 ? I have a Manfrotto tripod but might upgrade to a better head at some point.

  5. #15
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havoc View Post
    Which cable release would you recommend for the RZ67 ?
    Pretty much any mechanical standard cable release will do. Mamiya has/had a dual cable release for more convenient MLU shooting but in my opinion it's not worth the money.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  6. #16

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    I've been through a number of cable releases which have snapped or the covers break off. In one case the end of the release got stuck inside the lens release socket and the lens had to be serviced. When I find out the name of a really robust cable release I'll buy two - in the meantime take care !

  7. #17
    jjphoto's Avatar
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    I have a cable release which I am told (can't confirm) is a Haselblad release. It's excellent quality and has worked and lasted well. The cheap ones are a waste of money.

    JJ

  8. #18

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    Welcome to the wonderful world of RZ.

    Lenses...a three lens kit is always a nice goal for a start.
    Maybe, keep a space of one or two focal lengths between each lens at first, ie; 50mm or 65mm, 110mm, 180mm, etc...
    and any of these could be your [must have's], including the 140mm and 210mm. (Opinions & bellybuttons...everybody has one).

    Film backs...having two or three 120 backs is more useful, (my opinion), before buying even one 220 back.
    Not that much 220 film left.

    The 6 X 6 back is pricey, and a bit rare. It was only made during the early years of the original RZ Pro,
    mostly for slide presentations. Slide projectors for square, 6 X 6 MF slide mounts, were available from multiple manufactures,
    but projectors for rectangular, 6 X 7 mounts were rare, and very, very expensive. Still are.

    The 6 X 4.5 (645) backs are useful, especially when trying a new lens or technique, bracketing, etc...with 15 shots a roll instead of ten.
    Some criticize this theory, saying, "If you're going to pack around the heft of a RZ, shoot the full 6 X 7 frame."
    I don't shoot my 645 back very often, but far more often then my 220 back. May be that's just me.

    Prisms & Winders...the RZ Pro II, requires it's own, dedicated, (and usually more expensive) version of these two accessories.
    Unless modified, the AE prism from an original RZ Pro, won't work on a Pro II.

    Fine-focus knob...the fine focus gearing on the RZ Pro II, can be easily stripped. As the name implies, only use the fine focusing knob
    just for that final, tiny little bit of bellows movement. Turn the fine focus knob...slowly, and...sparingly.

    Enjoy,
    Marc

  9. #19
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Just to clarify (it has been mentioned), you really should have two cable release cables;
    - You need one to do mirror lockup shooting
    BUT
    - You will need two if you are using mirror lockup AND bulb-shooting. (press and hold the camera attached one to lift the mirror, then press the lens attached one to open the lens aperture, release the camera attached one to close everything and bring the mirror down again).

    I have a 50mm and a 110mm lens for mine, I am on the look-out for a 150mm or a 180mm lens for it.
    (divide by around 2 to get the 35mm equivalent focal length when you are shooting with a 6*7 back).

    As mentioned, check the manual carefully to get a good idea on how the camera works, you can also check out youtube to see people loading the back with film if you are unsure how to do it.

    It's a big bugger, so I've been using it on tripod only so far, but when the light is good and the shutter speed is fast enough, it should be doable to shoot hand held. I would believe that it is "even easier" with a eye level viewfinder and the winder.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  10. #20

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    shooting it handheld is definitely doable, it's how I shoot mine all the time. The L-grip, motor drive, and AE prism really help in that regard.

    All the lenses are good, and extremely reasonably priced vs. what they used to be new. Can't go wrong with any of the ones mentioned, however I'd recommend not bothering with the 90 or 127, as the 110 is better than both.

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