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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    LJ,

    A bunch of years back I took apart a 105mm Nikkor-P to learn how it all works. In that lens the helicoids would turn 'within each other'. To keep the lens element assembly itself from turning when you turned the focusing ring there was a small brass projection attached to it that moved forward and backward in a slot machined in one of the helicoid's parts. This projection stopped the lens itself from rotating. This projection was split down the middle and had a counter sink headed screw screwed into the split. If this projection narrowed, or the slot it traveled in widened, through wear one could increase the width of the projection by screwing the screw a little deeper into the projection, thereby taking up the slop. Very clever. Perhaps your 1.2 has some slop that has to throw that projection to one side or the other of its slot and you're feeling that as a moment of free play when focusing. That 105 is #126380 and supposedly dates to 1959 or 1960 so your lens certainly has a different mechanism. But perhaps not that different.

    Good luck

    s-a

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Hawaii
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    35mm RF
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    715
    Yes, I call that the Key, in the Ais (I think, it could be different in the Ai version) it fits into a smaller slot than the larger brass that the older Nikkor-Auto 105mm P has. It sounds to me to be the key may need that adjustment. Over time there can be wear on that key, I should look at mine but I know if I do I'll probably take it apart and replace it. The slot the key linearly travels in can wear, that's why you can very precisely widen that key so there is no slop, Don't Overtighten, start with One Hour adjustment (only turn the slot the amount of one hour as if the screw face were a clock face) and test, if its still too sloppy add another hour. In addition, the two screws holding that key can develop some play, I think I recall on the Ais version it may be held by the red Nikon sealant. Now that I think of I am going to check out the internal build of my Ais shell. Stay tuned.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Utah Valley
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    Don't everyone take your lenses apart on my account!

    This is very interesting though, I may just open my 1.2 to see what I can see; if I make a mess and can't get it back together, I'll have an excuse to get the AI version (unless my wife finds out what I've done

    I should clarify what I meant in my original post, however. I'm not having trouble with my photos being out of focus. I'm merely picky, compulsive, and prone to anxiety

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Hawaii
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    Just put my Ai back together, and yes, I DO NOT recommend anyone dismantle their fine Nikkor optic unless they have experience and are willing to take the risk.

    The Ai version has the larger slot/guide assembly, with the sides of the slot adjustable, both sides being actual plates, held in place by 2 screws each.
    I will check my AIs version.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Utah Valley
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    Hey guys, many questions:

    Today I went to the optical lab next door to my office and borrowed some screwdrivers and a workbench. Starting at the lens mount, I took a deep breath and tore my way down to the aperture controls where I got stuck. I've removed the mount, aperture ring, and silver grip ring (one day I'll subscribe so I can post photos). Anyway, I see screws beneath the distance markings on the outer barrel, but I can't get to them. Also, the tab that screws to the aperture ring from inside has come disconnected from the aperture mechanism; how do you recouple it? Right now it's just rattling loose and even gets caught when I turn the focusing ring back and forth.

    I was shocked by the click-stop mechanism, by the way; why isn't there a ball-bearing instead of a little tab? And I don't like that the aperture ring is plastic. The indents for the click-stops are really worn, which may give a clue as to how much use this lens has had.

    There is a single, tiny screw right by the front element that I didn't try to remove. What does that do?

  6. #16

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    Jan 2012
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    Utah Valley
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    Oops, edit: the inside of the aperture ring isn't plastic, it's just painted a matte black.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Hawaii
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    715
    That little screw is what's needed to get thru to the front of the lens. Undo it and then twist that whole front barrel off, that holds the optical unit in place. Get that far and we'll see what to do next....

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Utah Valley
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    Ok, so starting from the rear is the wrong way. Unfortunately, I can't find a flat-head that small, even in the lab (the guy fabricates lenses for eyeglasses and doesn't know about camera lenses--plus he's on vacation, which is why I'm using his junk). I'll have to go to the store for screwdrivers or order a set.

    I was able to remove the front plate with the Nikkor logo though, I used the rubber focusing grip to twist it off by hand.

    This is actually kind of fun, I should have done this a long time ago but I was afraid. Thanks for your help though, I really appreciate it.

  9. #19
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
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    Multi Format
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    1,878
    If you have extras of a small screw driver that almost fits, you can file/grind down the sides until it does fit the right size. You have more guts than me with these more expensive optics and huge elements. best of luck.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hawaii
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    715
    Oh and the 'dimpled spring' aperture detent system is pretty good. The metal of that flat spring is harder than the anodized aluminum, so on lenses with *extreme* wear the inside of the ring wears first.

    (see my blog post with the story about this lens.)
    http://four-silver-atoms.com/2012/06...28mm-f2-8-ais/

    christiaan
    four-silver-atoms.com

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