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  1. #1

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    Freezing Film When You Do Not Have the Time to Process Immediately

    A quick question for our older and experienced shooters: How long can exposed film be frozen without the images suffering the risk of degradation? The reason I ask? About a week after Dwayne's ended K-14 processing, I found two rolls of KL in the bottom of my freezer. I am debating whether to leave them be and wait a bit to see if hand processing becomes feasible or whether to just go ahead and try my hand at processing the two as black and white images.

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I never freeze film. I keep a quantity of colour film in the fridge, but don't bother for black & white film. However, I live in England.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    The probability of a non-Kodak Kodachrome development process being introduced is rather remote.

    How a long a latent image may be viable on a particular emulsion is quite variable. I recently processed some test rolls of Fuji Acros that I exposed several years ago, and the image was absolutely fine. Another fellow had horrible problems with Ilford Pan-F, with the images having faded almost completely away. As it turns out, Pan-F must be processed ASAP, and it's a known problem with the emulsion.

    Very probably your film is fine.

  4. #4

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    I have on many many occasions accidentally and out of being broke left e6, c41, and BW film in the freezer with exposed but unprocessed images on the rolls- the longest being over a year. this one (from my wedding) fell and wasn't found for over 18 months sitting in the back of the freezer and then I processed it normally and besides some extra grain, the roll was all good.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	46420 I am highly doubting that processing will come available for Kodachrome film again...
    Last edited by jbwpro; 02-17-2012 at 02:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    hoffy's Avatar
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    "Who's Kodachrome?"
    "Kodachrome's dead baby...."
    (With apologies to Tarantino)

  6. #6
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I store my film in the freezer, until I load it.

    If I do not have enough exposed color negative film to make it worth mixing up the chemicals, I will refrigerate the exposed film until I have enough. I have done that for periods of months, not years.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #7

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    I have been wondering the same thing, I'm pretty broke right now and most of my film is 6-8 months from exposure.

    A couple rolls are over 20 years old but were freezer kept prior to exposure 4 months ago and from my past experience they should be fine.
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B+M 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
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  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Develop or have it done as black and white. I agree - the odds of EVER being able to process this film as color are extremely remote.

  9. #9

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    I recall having read instructions from Kodak never to freeze film, but only to refrigerate it. I have never seen a professional shop that kept film in a freezer.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by thuggins View Post
    I recall having read instructions from Kodak never to freeze film, but only to refrigerate it. I have never seen a professional shop that kept film in a freezer.
    ..."storage in a refrigerator or freezer can be highly beneficial", but blah blah disclaimer use by the "use by" date...

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...fo/e30/e30.pdf
    Hasselblad, Mamiya RB, Nikonos, Canon EOS

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