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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan W View Post
    Don't they all?
    No, many freezers are "manual" defrost only.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The freezers that automatically defrost are not ideal for film.
    Why? What effect does it have on the film?


    Steve.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Why? What effect does it have on the film?


    Steve.
    Steve:

    They defrost automatically by periodically warming up the freezer and its contents.

    And that isn't ideal for film.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Steve:

    They defrost automatically by periodically warming up the freezer and its contents.

    And that isn't ideal for film.
    Yep. However it's still better than leaving it at ambient where temp cycling will happen anyways. I also don't believe the defrost temp rises above standard refrigeration temperatures either.

    In short, use a freezer, any freezer.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    They defrost automatically by periodically warming up the freezer and its contents.

    And that isn't ideal for film.
    I'm sure it's not a real problem. If the defrost cycle is safe for stored food, film should be fine.


    Steve.

  6. #16

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    That has always been my guess too!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Best non-commercial freezers I've found for film are deep chest freezers.
    I bought a big chest freezer that I have in my basement a couple of years ago to keep my film etc. in, and to stop my wife complaining about me taking up all the space in the fridge/freezer in our kitchen, but at some time you have to defrost freezers or the build up of ice makes the motor work so hard that it packs up, so you need to have a plan B for this eventuality.
    Ben

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    at some time you have to defrost freezers or the build up of ice makes the motor work so hard that it packs up, so you need to have a plan B for this eventuality.
    How long does it take to de-frost a freezer? (I don't know as I can't remember ever doing it). Whatever length of time it is, it can't be detrimental to the film to allow it to warm up a bit then go cold again when the de-frost is finished.

    And what are you supposed to do with food in a freezer at de-frosting time?


    Steve.

  9. #19

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    I've actually shadowed someone who worked on so-called frost-free freezers. The way they work is that there's a timer on a 10-12 hour cycle. Every 10-12 hours the freezer goes from "freeze" to "defrost." The fan that normally kicks on during the freeze cycle is turned off, and a wire heats up, melting off any frost that has accumulated on the freezer's refrigeration coils. After 15 minutes, the defrost cycle is over and the freezer goes back into freeze mode. There's enough time to get the frost off of the coils, but not enough to significantly warm up the freezer. Your frozen film should be fine - after all, your ice cream didn't melt, did it?
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  10. #20

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    Thanks for all your input, everyone. I can't find the manual for my fridge online (and I doubt my landlady has it), so I can't check to see if the freezer on top my fridge has a defrost cycle (there is NO room at all in my efficiency apartment to put a mini freezer). I have been worrying that if I put my E-6 35mm in the freezer, that a defrost cycle would get to it and ruin it. I also want to save the Fuji 64T I have in medium format until I can afford a really good medium format camera, but I know that 120 comes in its own foil.

    I guess I'll just keep all of it in the fridge for now.
    Typical digital zombies say: "Adapt or die!" "The world is changing, change with it!" "Analog is old and nasty! EEEEEEEWWWWWW!" "Why should I pay money for getting my pictures when I can have everything NOW?" "Why shoot manual when you can have the camera do everything automatically?"

    Primary 35mm camera - Pentax K1000
    Secondary 35mm camera - Mamiya/Sekor 1000 DTL - M42 Mount
    Medium Format: Mamiya RB67

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