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  1. #51
    eurekaiv's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure it really died. There's quite a lot of half frame stuff on flickr, and a lot of it is really really good. As for me, it's my favorite format and my half frames are my favorite cameras. They're generally extremely simple to use and the size and weight makes any of them—including my beloved Pen FT—very easy to carry along with two or three other compact film cameras, in my camera bag/"murse" that goes everywhere I do. I've taken to buying 12 exposure rolls for specifically running through the half frames. In general, I get about 30 shots from a roll of 12 which for me is more then enough.
    Last edited by eurekaiv; 04-03-2012 at 11:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Sometimes I post my photos on flickr.
    Sometimes I update my tumblr.

  2. #52
    Dshambli's Avatar
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    I had never really been introduced to half frame, but it looks pretty cool. I might have to try this out.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    APS did not fail due to lack of quality. It failed because the film was more expensive than 35mm, the processing using the special lab machines dramatically more expensive, and by the time it was on the market 35mm cameras were available with many of the same features for much lower film and processing costs.
    The failure of APS was multiple in cause.

    Yes, it was significantly more expensive than processing 135 format, but it also had going against it that the prints were generally not as good as what you could get with a conventional 135 format camera. The smaller film format (the APS film surface area was only 56% of 135 film) helped in the demise as well. Unlike APS digital which does not have inherent grain, that meant that the inherent film grain was magnified by about 1.8x greater! So the upper limit on print size, before grain became objectionable, was smaller than for 135 format. That factor, which is frequently mentioned in retrospectives on the format, limited the commercial success.

    Additionally the expense of APS processing equipment made the number of locations that could process and print the film more restrictive, again an impediment to commercial success. And, with fewer and fewer places that can process the format now, that really limited the desirability of used cameras, even though you might be able to buy film.
    Last edited by wiltw; 04-03-2012 at 11:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #54
    MDR
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    Like photochemical photography halfframe is no longer part of the mainstream but it's still alive. My small halframe camera is the multiformat HF and FF Konica Autoreflex mostly set to HF. I like halfframe it gives me more grain with todays grainless films it allows me to shoot longer before changing the roll and it's the Ideal format to create in camera triptychs. I believe the last hf camera was the Yashica Samurai x 4 (1988 minilab era)

    Dominik

  5. #55
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Right you lot,

    Enough talk has happened, time to get to work and keep this format alive

    I have put a WTB ad in the classifieds and am looking for a Canon Demi - If any of you have an unused working one to sell cheaply please let me know

    Don't expect anything serious from this exercise, I will be using the worst film I can find and shoot sequences for multi-printing via a 10x8" enlarger and making diptychs to be printed together via a full frame 35mm enlarger

    Fun Time!!!!!

    John

  6. #56

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    I have two pen's ee-2. One loaded with color film and one with black and white pan f. They are nifty little camera's and they are my companions a lot of the time. I mainly scan the film and lately I have gotten to a more worked out idea what to do with the film.

    Love to get a pen f though. Would be nice to be able to switch lenses.
    Reality is whatever stays when you stop believing in it.
    darkroomninja.blogspot.com

  7. #57
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    The failure of APS was multiple in cause.

    Yes, it was significantly more expensive than processing 135 format, but it also had going against it that the prints were generally not as good as what you could get with a conventional 135 format camera. The smaller film format (the APS film surface area was only 56% of 135 film) helped in the demise as well. Unlike APS digital which does not have inherent grain, that meant that the inherent film grain was magnified by about 1.8x greater! So the upper limit on print size, before grain became objectionable, was smaller than for 135 format. That factor, which is frequently mentioned in retrospectives on the format, limited the commercial success.

    Additionally the expense of APS processing equipment made the number of locations that could process and print the film more restrictive, again an impediment to commercial success. And, with fewer and fewer places that can process the format now, that really limited the desirability of used cameras, even though you might be able to buy film.
    Of course it wasn't as good, but the vast majority of snapshots are never printed larger than 4x6 anyway. It was plenty good enough for that. I still think the real reasons are more to do with the expense. It was never really intended for the serious photographers who print a lot of 8x10s and 11x14s anyway.

  8. #58
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    There are those who like grain. And those who don't care.
    I fell in love with my Pen-F and Ilford Universal 400. Sharp lens, making soft pictures because the grain is the size of a baseball.

    Quote Originally Posted by moki
    just added a mask from thin black cardboard that leaves 18mm in the middle of the full frame.
    Thanks for the idea! I'll have to do that with my Nikon. I hadn't thought of the odd-even bit.

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    Yes they were cute little cameras, but not all ideas are good ones. I can't say I ever saw a 1/2 frame print that wasn't a lot grainier than I like. For me it's like running 35mm film through a 120 camera, why bother?

    Mike
    you are right mike,
    some things aren't for everyone ---
    i'm glad for that, because if we all liked the same stuff life would be pretty boring ...

  10. #60

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    Amazing that some of you old guys who were around prior to or after WWII did not chime in. Before WWII there were few, if any 1 frame 35mm cameras and these were more speicalty cameras than mainstream wuch as Robot and Tessena. During WWII film became a military commodity like so many other things and subject to consumer and export controls. After the war, most of the film production facilities outside of the US and UK were destroyed and the needed chemicals were subject to controls. As a result, film was both scarce and expensive in many markets, Japan being 1 of them. The US brass controlling the rebuilding of Japan knew that the boys over there had the German glass formula and did not have the cold war problems and rebuilding issues plaguing the other former AXIS powers so one of the industries slated for being rebuilt were related to photography as it had a ready market and the US camera manufacturers were not a strong lobbying force. The film problem was an issue though as could choke the rebuilding effort. The Japanese developed the 1 frame camera format to get the most images per footage and to bring down the cost per frame since the price of film was very high.

    Hence, Japan began to make and market the 1/2 frame camera in its market and soon after to the US service personnel through the PX and finally got permission to export them. The problem was most makers could not grind the lenses to the quality needed to make a good lens for the format so most did not concentrate on the format. Olympus was able to obtain the German glass formula glass from, my understanding Nikon, and concentrated on learning to grind glass to the needed levels to make a good 1/2 lens. Where others failed of had limited success, Olympus succeeded and came out with its line of cameras. It was highly successful as a format in Japan and at least in the US market as they were sold through the PX at prices today we'd drool for and they also were able to establish and maintain a good distribution system in the US. But, with controls finally being lifted and film becoming plentiful and at reduced prices, the economizing of film declined and the market once again returned to 2 frame 35mm as the preferred format. Kodak, during the 1.2 frame period marketed 12 frame film so the 1/2 frame camera could produce 24 exposures. Here in the US they also introduced it but as a film for the realtors so they could have short roll abilities to photograph 1 home and have the film developed but, it was short lived. I can not remember the emulsion but it was not to my liking.

    I got caught up in the 1/2 frame collector market in the early '80s when everyone and his brother were trading them for the 1 frame cameras and you had your pick on an average of $5 per camera. I had just about 1 of every model from Olympus including the Pen F lineup that I fell in love with. I also had the Konica Autoreflex that was switchable between the 1 and 2 frame format and an Alpa body plus others from Japan and 1 of the Exacta 1/2 frame bodies. About 1990, the Olympus rep that covered NYC and FL was running around collecting the PEN - F cameras, accessories and lenses at prices indicating he knew something no one else seemed to. The local dealer knew of my collection and called to see if I wanted to sell. I explained I'd be interest but only a complete buyout of all my collection of 1/2 frames and the Exacta collection for a decent MF system and a small 35mm camera as well as something I always wanted, a Minox LX. We cut the deal for a nearly new Bronica ETRS system, a Minox ML 35mm camera and an LX. I later learned that the doctors in NY were clamoring for F sereis bodies to backup the F dental body that was no longer made and were willing to pay almost anything for them as they were used on their microscopes and other instruments.

    I have since acquired a Konica AA-35 1/2 frame and from time to time still use it when I want a shirt pocket film camera. It is not up to the quality of the Oly glass but, still very good as a daily user.

    They are still realtively inexpensive on the used market so, if you've never tried 1, go for it. Admittedly a 1 frame slide ain't up to a 645 slide but at the average home viewing difference you won't lose much against a 2 fram slide. Only shortcoming is spending the time mounting the slides as most labs today do not carry the slide frames that are 35mm outside dimention but for the 1 frame format so they can be used with most slide projectors.



 

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