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  1. #11

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    Once I left the leader out so I could later easily load it onto the reel instead of cracking open the can later but I accidentally lost track of it and had a hard time determining it from unexposed film. Managed to determine which was which after looking closely at the sprockets (exposed ones looked like they had been drag or dented). From then one, after every roll, I would wind it all the way into the can so I would know it had been exposed.

    Leaving it out was just not worth the hassle for me.....

  2. #12
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Otherwise, I don't see any reason to leave the leader out.
    I do it because I'm a cheap bastid and reuse the cassettes for bulk loading and don't want to pop the can.
    I do number how many uses they've seen and also am meticulous regarding dust. I will sometimes clean the felt trap with tape.
    Scratches can and do occur on occasion.

  3. #13
    Dshambli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    I do it because I'm a cheap bastid and reuse the cassettes for bulk loading and don't want to pop the can.
    I do number how many uses they've seen and also am meticulous regarding dust. I will sometimes clean the felt trap with tape.
    Scratches can and do occur on occasion.
    How do you then load the film without popping the can? I started bulk loading, and I'm liking it. I just got my first bulk roll developed, an expired (way expired) roll of Ektachrome 200. The results were interesting, but it's got that "lomo" aesthetic that would be better suited for someone else. I've also got a frozen roll of Plus-X that expired in the '80's in the freezer. It's going to be nice when I start loading in date film.

    However, to answer the original question, I keep the exposed rolls out of the canisters (leaders wound in). Unless it's 120, then I usually return it to a wrapper.

  4. #14
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dshambli View Post
    How do you then load the film without popping the can? I started bulk loading, and I'm liking it. I just got my first bulk roll developed, an expired (way expired) roll of Ektachrome 200. The results were interesting, but it's got that "lomo" aesthetic that would be better suited for someone else. I've also got a frozen roll of Plus-X that expired in the '80's in the freezer. It's going to be nice when I start loading in date film.

    However, to answer the original question, I keep the exposed rolls out of the canisters (leaders wound in). Unless it's 120, then I usually return it to a wrapper.
    After I load the film on the reel I snip the film so there is enough to tape the bulk film. 1-1 1/2inches will do the trick. (sorta like a leader at the end of the roll off the spool itself)
    I usually shoot 35 frames to better fit into a printfile for 8x10 contact sheet so there is plenty of film at the end of a store bought load.

  5. #15
    cscurrier's Avatar
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    I usually rewind but leave the leader sticking out. Then I just bend the leader so there's a significant crease so I know it's spent. Sometimes, I just rewind all the way back in the canister. Sorry, not much more to add than what already's been stated.
    "If it can be written or thought, it can be filmed." - Stanley Kubrick

  6. #16
    Wade D's Avatar
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    I don't think I've ever left the leader out unless the roll is partially shot and I plan to use it later.

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I leave the leader out so I can start it into the spiral in the light then finish off in the dark. I can always tell a leader which has been wound round a camera's take up spool.

    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Why risk scratching the film by pulling it back through the light trap to process it?
    It's never happened to me. It passes through the light trap twice in the camera and possibly another time in the factory so one more pass shouldn't cause a problem.


    As an aside, why do Americans refer to a bag as a baggie? There are at least two examples of this in this thread (you usually leave letters out of words rather than add in extra letters!).


    Steve.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by cscurrier View Post
    I usually rewind but leave the leader sticking out. Then I just bend the leader so there's a significant crease so I know it's spent. Sometimes, I just rewind all the way back in the canister. Sorry, not much more to add than what already's been stated.
    I'm with CSCURRIER on this one. If the camera I'm using leaves the leader out then two sharp bends in the film leader mean that I cannot reload this film into a camera accidentally. It's no problem to trim the leader prior to loading onto a reel for developing. If the camera rewinds the leader completely then once again I would treat the film as exposed and there is no risk of reloading the film into a camera.

  9. #19
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    I roll the film all the way into the canister, and immediately mark each roll with the EI I shot it at. More often that not this is 1600 for neopan 400/tri-x/hp5+ so if I forget to do so, I generally just process for that time anyway. With 120 I write the EI on the adhesive. I develop about 1 unexposed roll that has been rolled up by accident a year, so this system works pretty well for me. I also keep exposed film in a separate compartment in my camera bags than unused rolls to prevent confusion.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  10. #20
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    As an aside, why do Americans refer to a bag as a baggie? There are at least two examples of this in this thread (you usually leave letters out of words rather than add in extra letters!).


    Steve.
    "Baggies" is an American brand of plastic food storage bags. Google "Hefty Baggies" for examples.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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