Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,218   Posts: 1,532,216   Online: 872
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Autofocus?

  1. #11
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    984
    Images
    4
    If you have only used digital point and shoot cameras then a manual focus, SLR, 35mm camera will be completely different to you. As many have already said, manual focus cameras can be fairly easy to focus properly since they usually had focusing aids to help you focus the lens. But they will not be very fast, especially if you are just learning. A good autofocus SLR film camera can be quite easy to use and will be much better, and faster, than a digital point and shoot.

    Many of the people on this forum, myself included, have been using film cameras for years and manual focus is not new to us. But for someone who has never used it before it will be slow to use. If you only intend to take pictures of scenery, landscape, flowers, macro objects, or very slow moving things then you won't find that a problem. In those cases manual focus can actually be better. But if you want to take pictures of kids, sports, pets, or other quicker moving objects you will get frustrated pretty quickly. After years of practice a lot of people can get good enough with manual focus to keep up with fast moving objects, after all people were taking sports pictures way before auto focus was invented, but learning to do that takes practice. Of course, one clear advantage to manual focus, when you get the lens focused on something, you know what you focused on. Some auto focus cameras can pick something entirely different to focus on then what you intended, and unless you are watching closely you may not realize it while you are taking pictures. Only later when you get them developed will you realize that some of your shots are out of focus. That may also be what is causing you trouble focusing your point and shoot camera.

    I love Pentax because the lenses are so interchangeable. You can use lens from almost any period on any Pentax camera from around 1977 on. Nikon is almost as nice in that respect and their auto focus cameras tend to focus much faster than most other cameras. The advantage with those two camera brands is that you will be more likely to be able to use the same lens on a manual focus camera as well as an auto focus camera, if you do decide to try one or the other later on. Canon, Olympus, Sony, etc. make magnificent cameras as well, but their auto focus and manual focus equipment don't usually play with each other very well. What I mean is that their manual focus lenses won't hook up to their auto focus cameras, and vice versa since they changed their lens mounts throughout the years.

    Like others here, I suggest that you go to a reputable camera shop in your area (not Wal-Mart or Best Buy) and try the different types of cameras they have, auto and manual focus, to see which you find easier to use. Some of these shops will even let you rent equipment for a weekend which gives you a terrific opportunity to try things out. Of course, most of these shops will be selling new digital equipment but they should also have used film equipment available to try out as well. New film cameras are pretty rare anymore. They are available but are most frequently the lower quality, manual focus equipment. Holgas, Vivitars and Nikon FM10s come to mind. There are also some VERY expensive, high quality, film cameras out there as well, but they are probably not the best way for you to start out unless money really is not an issue for you.

    I would suggest that you start with a 35mm camera. Medium format is also very nice, but the film is a lot bigger, more expensive, and more expensive and difficult to get developed. The cameras for medium format film are almost always much bigger and bulkier to carry around and use as well. Of course large format is also still out there, but it comes in sheets, not rolls, and takes a totally different style of camera that is far bigger than either of the other two types. Depending on what it is that you want to do, medium format and large format can certainly work for you, but they are not usually considered the best way for beginners to start out and learn on.

    I hope all this made some sense and helped you out a little.

  2. #12
    Gatsby1923's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Holyoke, MA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    243
    Images
    63
    I actually find manual focus second nature and with split screen focusing I actually prefer it unless you are talking about a very high end SLR. Some of the early auto focus SLR's did a lot of "Searching" when auto focusing.
    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.
    Carl Sandburg

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    19
    Hey everyone,
    Thanks for all the replies.
    To be honest i figure i would buy a cheap film SLR, play around for a while then once i get used to it...invest in maybe a better more expensive one...though having said this i can't afford too much.
    For now i would be taking photos of family and friends....i never mastered digital photography i am a beginner so i know i will will probably waste some film but i guess that comes with learning.
    I get the impression manual focus is different on film cameras to digital, i only ever used manual focus on digital when i play around with macro, i found it alot of guess work.
    I'm not so worried to get manual now, i might see if i can go to this shop called camera exchange which is in box hill victoria/australia. it's a long drive (i'm in the Dandenong ranges)but i think it might be worth it...
    Thanks again from Casey.

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,539
    Images
    15
    Well, you couldn't get a more beautiful place to get up close and personal with a manual-focus SLR than the Dandenong Ranges! Manual focus is very touchy-feely, if you like, while AF is do-it-all-while-you-wait. AF is faster and can be very precise, but you need to make sure an AF lens is focusing on what you intend to be in focus. You will, over time and experience, develop precision using manual focus, without which you will end up with blurry pictures! Camera Exchange is a great place to fossick about, with cameras from small to humungous; mostly digital bodies that have been discarded by "professionals" in preference to the next best thing or sexiest bod contours <sigh>. You might even get to man-handle a Hasselblad, many of which grace the glass shelves there. Don't assume you need an expensive camera to make good pictures; the trick is in your skill in foundation photography.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #15
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    The difference between AF camera focus and MF camera focus, is normally in the focus screen.

    AF screens simply are not really designed to make manual focus easy/primary.

    Look around at local thrift stores or estate sales and the like, it is not uncommon to find nice 35mm cameras for $10-20 here in the US.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Well, you couldn't get a more beautiful place to get up close and personal with a manual-focus SLR than the Dandenong Ranges! Manual focus is very touchy-feely, if you like, while AF is do-it-all-while-you-wait. AF is faster and can be very precise, but you need to make sure an AF lens is focusing on what you intend to be in focus. You will, over time and experience, develop precision using manual focus, without which you will end up with blurry pictures! Camera Exchange is a great place to fossick about, with cameras from small to humungous; mostly digital bodies that have been discarded by "professionals" in preference to the next best thing or sexiest bod contours <sigh>. You might even get to man-handle a Hasselblad, many of which grace the glass shelves there. Don't assume you need an expensive camera to make good pictures; the trick is in your skill in foundation photography.
    Hey, haha everyone says things like that....i think i take it for granted...i guess going to a local look out and just practice practice practice...at least a landscape doesn't move out of place!
    Cool, i will go down to camera action soon as i can, they are selling manual lenses 50mm for different brands for $95 according to their website which is great....assuming 50mm is okay i know it's not like digital where it becomes a longer lens with the digital crop bodies. i guess it will get me started.
    What you said about " focusing on what you intend to be in focus" is interesting, seems either way i will have to learn how to master it...if i get one photo turn out in my first film roll, i'll be happy

  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,539
    Images
    15
    By the sound of it, you're organised. Be careful what you are being offered. A manual focus lens is just that: no AF. An AF lens usually by design allows the use of less-than-precise manual-focus (termed 'trim'). Also check out Camera Lane in Little Lonsdale Street City and Michaels: both have a good range of well-known and affordable MF lenses e.g. Nikon, Olympus and some Pentax. A 50mm is fine to start with, but 35, 28 and even 24 (with progressively more skill necessary in terms of composition) are good choices for the landscape. Much of my own work is now with a Canon TS-E manual focus lens; I just have never warmed to the MF/trim of AF lenses.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    50mm is fine. It's a normal lens for 35mm. Henri Catier-Bresson made a truly successful career with one.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,622
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Camera Exchange is a great place to fossick about,
    I just learned a new word! And my ol' lady said I waste my time on APUG... ha!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    I just learned a new word! And my ol' lady said I waste my time on APUG... ha!
    haha

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin