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  1. #1
    shaocaholica's Avatar
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    General question about leaf shutter compacts shutter speed setting

    I have a few fixed lens RFs and scale focus compacts. Yashica 35, Minolta 7s, Rollei 35, Minox, etc. These are all leaf shutter cameras BTW.

    What I've learned from playing with large format lenses is that you shouldn't change the shutter speed after cocking the shutter. How about for these compact cameras? It seems their leaf shutters work in a similar way with different springs for different speeds but I would think that their more consumer targeted market, they would have shutter designs that was more forgiving.

    So, the bottom line is, is it ok to change shutter speeds on these leaf shutter compacts after cocking?

  2. #2
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Generally it is OK, for instance with the Rollei 35 it is impossible to close the thing without first cocking the shutter and my favourite Vitessa also allows speed changing when wound

    I presume the problem you are referring to with LF lens shutters is in the older Compurs where the top speed has an added spring in use, which is very noticeable when winding the shutter - Just wait a moment while I check my Retina 119 - OK, I am back, yes the Retina 119 also needs to have the high speed set before the shutter is wound

    Anyway, change the speeds without the shutter wound and if you feel a resistance going to the highest speed set the number first

    John

  3. #3

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    depends on the shutter -- never heard of large format shutters you couldn't change after they are cocked, not sure why they should be different than those on a scale focus compact 35 or anything else. Both copal and Compur made shutters that work with cams that adjust the degree of delay by adjusting the throw on a retarding gear train.

    The ONLY exception to the "go ahead and change it after you cocked it" rule is the older compur shutters that have a second spring that is engaged when you shift to the top speed - ie. 1/500th, mostly found on older Rolleis and Zeiss, such as my Ikonta Super B andC -- on these you have to engage the top speed BEFORE you cock the shutter and fire it before you change it back to a lower speed. You can easily spot these shutters because shifting it from 1/250 to 1/500 you can feel the definite added amount of force it takes.

    By the way, even shutters for large format cameras don't have different springs for different speeds, except for the shutters that have the extra for the top speed. The Kodak Supermatics don't use it, for example, and I have one of those on my speed graphic.

    With or without the extra spring, just as an aside, the top labeled speed is rarely achieved as marked, especially on older shutters that haven't been serviced in the last 30 years or so. Pretty amazing they work so well, but that's how they used to make things.

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    You will always want to set your shutter speed AFTER cocking the shutter on a Zorki 4.

  5. #5
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Not that a Zorki has a leaf shutter.

  6. #6

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    I can only speak for the Rollei 35(SE) here, because I own one. In fact (as already stated above), you cannot store the lens unless the shutter is cocked. This is because the lever that operates the lens is in the way until cocked. Thus, when you pull the lens out the camera is already cocked. Unless you waste a shot by firing the shutter to reset the shutter speed, you would have no other way of resetting it. I have been using my Rollei since early 80s and so far it still works well. Shot a roll of film with it yesterday.



 

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