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  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Utah Valley
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    275
    I just got back from a road trip to California.

    I brought a single F2 body and the following lenses:
    18mm /f4
    50mm f/1.2
    135mm f/3.5

    Most of the shots I took were through the window of the moving car; I think 50mm is the perfect focal length for this, and a larger-than-necessary hood helps. I didn't try using a polarizer. I used the 18 for maybe two shots of a destroyed house and I didn't use the 135 at all. The 50 was fine for walking about Hollywood (can't go to SoCal without visiting Amoeba) but a 35 would have worked too, although I don't even currently own one and I don't feel like I'm missing out.

    I did leave the motor drive home and missed it the whole time. The MD1 is damned heavy but I sometimes think it was made for me; it fits my hands and shooting style perfectly.

  2. #52

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
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    298
    50/1.4 and 24/2.8 for me! I'd be ok with a just a 35/2 or 35/1.8 if I could get my hands on one...

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    Whenever I went to Europe, I always took the 28pc Nikkor, and some others, but wound up almost always using the pc, or the 24mm. The pc (perspective control) lens is great for city or landscape, and especially architecture (that's what my degree is, although I never practiced, I still shoot like an architect, I suppose). It's a preset lens, so it's not as fast shooting, but even on landscapes, it's great to be able to find the perspective you want, relative to objects, then shift the lens to recompose the frame, like having half of a view camera. You don't see many around, but maybe you can borrow one. Nikon made a 35 and a 28, but the 28 is much better (and, I think came later).

  4. #54
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
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    For Europe I always prefer the 28mm lens.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    South Carolina, USA
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    Whenever I am in Eastern Europe I take a 28 and a 50 with whatever camera system I am using. The 28 is used 90% of the time.

  6. #56
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
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    35mm
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    When I am a tourist I just avoid changing lenses in the street. It's one or two cameras, but each with its own lens.

    I would go with one zoom lens, something like 28 - 80, and one camera, as a first approximation.

    I am one of those who walk 20 km a day when I do the tourist. Don't go for "fast" lenses. Use a moderately fast film (200).
    This keeps the weight low and the action ready. When you are abroad you are probably taking more pictures than at home (many more things will catch your attention, architectural details, people etc.) changing lens is a nuisance and it detracts from the pleasure and the image. Zoom is fine, I say.

    Tele lenses (such as 135 or longer) have this problem that you carry them with you for 20 km a day and you take 2 or 3 images with them per day. The sweating/result ratio is unfavourable. In case, bring a duplicator. I know, duplicator + zoom lens is not going to produce excellent quality, but when I travel I forget excellent quality, I go for acceptable compromises. Keep weight low and action fast.

    If you are prepared to add a second camera, then I would add a camera with a 24mm.

    As a zoom-less alternative: bring a SLR with a 28 and a compact with a 50. Bring also a 135mm. You will take most pictures with the 50mm (compact) and 28mm (SLR) without having to change lens. Only occasionally you will mount the 135 instead of the 28.

    My typical travel gear is a small bag with a camera with a zoom (28-85 if film, 24-120 equivalent when I bring my digital, which I do when I go abroad) and a Bessa-L with an ultra-wide 15mm (if you bring the 28-80, the ultra-wide should be a 21).

    With this kind of setup I can walk 10 hours or so per day and maintain decent flexibility and smoothness of action, which is very important IMO, one must not be "distracted" by one's gear, especially lens changes.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #57
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
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    My lightweight walkabout travel kit is a Canon FD body with an FD 28-85mm f4 zoom lens fitted.
    Ben

  8. #58
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Mar 2012
    Location
    Lincoln, UK
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    Perhaps I am thick, but why does being in Europe need a different lens to being elsewhere? I am permanently in Europe and use various lenses with no ill effects.

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peltigera View Post
    Perhaps I am thick, but why does being in Europe need a different lens to being elsewhere? I am permanently in Europe and use various lenses with no ill effects.
    I think Mr. Ambivalent is traveling to Europe, possibly from the U.S., and wants to know which lenses to bring - since he can't conveniently nip back to the house for that other lens.

  10. #60
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
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    You will be happy either with a 28mm or a 35mm. Loads of film...loads of film. Perhaps an Yellow filter or Yellow-Green Filter.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.



 

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