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  1. #21
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    I use 91% isopropyl alcohol(about $2/bottle) and cotton balls to clean my lenses. If I need to get out something in a nook or cranny, I use a cotton swab. If lint is left behind, I hit it with a puff of canned air. 99% of the time it dispels any surface dust or debris left over from the swab.

    Learned this trick from a retired pro who's been shooting since the mid 50's(he's now in his mid 80's). He's cleaned all his lenses from then to now(so older coated/uncoated glass to the latest G-series Nikon lenses) this way, and NEVER had an issue related to this cleaning method.

    I put mine in an amber eye-dropper bottle, it makes it easier to dispense out onto the swab, so I don't saturate it.

    -Dan


  2. #22
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    DanielStone: the problem with using alcohol is that the static is not lessened. With either ammonia or a bit of soap it is. This makes a BIG difference when you are cleaning inside elements especially because you want to remove all dust before you close that element into the lens body. Holding the element in front of a light bulb is the most ruthless (and necessary) test for dust. The alcohol allows (and encourages) dust to cling tenaciously. - David Lyga

  3. #23

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    Jan 2005
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    Downers Grove Illinois
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    Zeiss in the individual foil packets, Walmart and other places around $3 for box of 50. Larger boxes available.

    Sams Club, part of Walmart, I found two 6 oz bottles same solvent with spritz heads so you spritz the included microfiber cloth.

    The problem with Microfiber is they get dirty so keep in a plastic bag. Embeded dirt may scratch.

    Always blow off first, then brush. Stop if this is sufficient. If the cleaning cloth picks up solid debris, it may scratch.

    I have tried all kinds of fluids and this leaves the least residue. If you have to go the fluid route more than annually, you are not using the lens cap enough.

  4. #24
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    This is the best lens cleaner I've ever used in more than fifty years,http://www.ror.net/, it's made in California, I use it to clean photographic lenses,my glasses, flat screen monitors , binoculars, and flat screenTVs.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 06-08-2012 at 07:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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