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  1. #21
    ambaker's Avatar
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    If your adapter has a compatible focus confirm chip, then you would want to activate the switch when it is mounted,

    If your adapter does not have a compatible focus confirm chip, the opposite would be true.

    In theory, the switch should not be a source of battery drain. If a regular EF lens were mounted, then the same thing should happen. The camera should be shutting down, when not in use, switch on or off. But then I turn my cameras off at the main switch, just to be sure something isn't pressing on the trigger, activating the camera when it is in the bag.

  2. #22

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    Yeah, I got a wire between the + and - of the battery somehow. I remember it wasn't pretty. Now I checked all my lenses and adapters. Some chipped adapters (nikon-EOS and M42-EOS) have a short bayonet piece there, that probably doesn't flip the switch (don't know if they do or don't drain the battery). My chipless Samyang has a long one (and doesn't drain battery) and my chipped OM adapter has a long one too and does drain the battery. I'll do some more tests later this week.

  3. #23
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandermarijn View Post
    Still wondering what the purpose of the tab/switch/lever is.
    I'm going to ask the local camera tech when they open on Tuesday.

    In the mean time, I ground down the piece on my Mamiya adapter that was activating the switch (thanks, DWC, dunno why my brain couldn't sort that one out) and it works on the EOS 3. Next task is to take some actual pictures with a real lens mounted.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  4. #24
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Lens mount index confirmation. The flange engages here and pulls it up, thus confirming with the body that the is in the correct position and electronic control state is readied.
    It's best not to fiddle with it.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #25
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    I have been using the M-42-EOS adapter for some time on my EOS 3 HS and have not seen any problems with battery drain . I am using 8x Eneloop batteries since Febuaryish and are still fully charged after 4-6 rls per month. I also have forgotten to shut if off in between times. Why Canon did not install a automatic shut off makes me wonder sometimes.

  6. #26
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Lens mount index confirmation. The flange engages here and pulls it up, thus confirming with the body that the is in the correct position and electronic control state is readied.
    It's best not to fiddle with it.
    Well, I have fiddled with it, in the sense that the adapter's bayonet now no longer engages the switch. That's made everything seem to work fine, contrary to when the adapter did push up the lever (mirror went up, shutter did not fire, mirror did not go down).

    I wonder what the penalty for not engaging the switch is.

    Poisson du Jour, can you elaborate on what you describe as the readying of the electronic control state?

  7. #27
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatulent1 View Post
    I'm going to ask the local camera tech when they open on Tuesday.
    That'd be cool. I'm very curious.

  8. #28
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    Me too.....I have had no bad effects or camera damage (yet?)
    Last edited by dances_w_clouds; 06-18-2012 at 02:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatulent1 View Post
    I'm going to ask the local camera tech when they open on Tuesday.
    While you're there, ask if that flux capacitor ever needs any maintenance.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #30
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandermarijn View Post
    Well, I have fiddled with it, in the sense that the adapter's bayonet now no longer engages the switch. That's made everything seem to work fine, contrary to when the adapter did push up the lever (mirror went up, shutter did not fire, mirror did not go down).

    I wonder what the penalty for not engaging the switch is.

    Poisson du Jour, can you elaborate on what you describe as the readying of the electronic control state?


    EOS bodies are electronic; legacy mechanical linkages, such as this one on the body flange, are about the limit of non-electronic interfaces. You will notice that if you remove the lens and try and fire, nothing happens: the body has safeguards to prevent firing without a lens attached. The lens mount transmits a huge amount of information to the body the moment it is mounted (positive click). It does so only when the index is positively engaged. If it is not, an error state is generated. IIRC through the MIR EOS site, the flange lever plays an important role in diagnostics when, for instance, the EOS 1N is connected to a technical interface via the hot shoe to assess control circuits, lens-body-body-lens communication, focus position, Tv/Av settings, shutter/shutter curtain delay and accuracy, drive readiness, drive wind and rewind cue (build up of tension at frame #36); there are many other checks possible. I imagine that if the switch is not engaged the body will not know a lens is positively attached and lens-body circuits are connected and ready.

    The EOS 600 does not have a system reset (like the 1N, 1V) to clear fault states. I would not attempt to organise the camera yourself at the risk of incurring damage — it's not clear why the mirror is behaving in the manner you described.

    More information (on all EOS bodies) can be found on the MIR EOS site (I am a contributor to this very large resource project): http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...s/MapEOS1n.htm)
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

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