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Thread: Film revival

  1. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagepics View Post
    I see your point. As I have seen a sharp rise in cameras such as the C3, there has been a huge drop in camera prices such as the N90s. Interesting.

    It appears to me that the rise in prices of film cameras on E-bay, mainly relates to the totally mechanical stuff that seem to be regarded as "classics"....Electronic cameras like the N90 (F90x) in Europe, don't have quite the same cache'. That being said, the F90x is a fine camera, I've used one myself for many years, and is a bargain at current s/h prices.

    I've not bought any camera gear on e-bay for ages. The desirable gear tends to go for the kind of prices that are close to what a camera dealer will charge. And with a dealer, usually comes a guarantee.

  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagepics View Post
    Do you think this has anything to do with the fact that grain in an emulsion is stacked, and has a depth to it, and the sensors on a digital camera are placed side by side? I've noticed that prints on silver often have have what appears to be depth to the image, where as digital seems to lack this.

    Let me relate an incident that relates to the above. A friend, in order to demonstrate the incredible capability of the (then) new Nikon D3 of opening up the shadows in available light photography, had taken a night shot of a churchyard in which every conceivable area of darkness had been opened up to reveal every last bit of detail in the church.

    There is no doubt it was a remarkable camera. However, my friend had missed the whole point about photography.
    He was mainly concerned with pixels not pictures. If I'm taking a picture of a churchyard at night, then I want it to look like a night picture. I want there to be areas of darkness hiding parts of the scene, because this gives a picture atmosphere and a touch of mystery. This is what film gives me.

    The word "atmosphere" is very important in a picture, yet is often ignored. Witness the wonderful examples of erotic photography by Victorian photographers, even though their lenses were "soft" compared to modern ones.
    Compare these with the often cold, clinical examples of so called "glamour" studio photography today. I know which ones I prefer.

  3. #93

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    speaking about night pictures, I generally don't want to see any thing in the picture that I couldn't see at the scene.

  4. #94
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagepics View Post
    Do you think this has anything to do with the fact that grain in an emulsion is stacked, and has a depth to it, and the sensors on a digital camera are placed side by side? I've noticed that prints on silver often have have what appears to be depth to the image, where as digital seems to lack this.
    Results are largely dependent on the the printer's skills and their processes and materials, far less so on capture medium. Ask a master like Bob Carnie.

  5. #95

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    I know that Olympus film cameras and lenses have doubled or tripled in price over the past few months. Ebay is getting crazy. Very few of the items I watch end with no bids. I am constantly losing out to the snipers.

    Typically, the snipers have thousands of feedbacks, indicating to me they are in the buy-and-sell business, not collectors nor users.

    Who would be buying at these inflated prices if they didn't believe they would be making a profit on the resale?

    Even if they were buying cameras just to get the lenses, one would expect a flood of unwanted 35mm slr bodies and I haven't seen that with Olympus.

    I don't watch other brands so I can't comment on them.
    - Bill Lynch

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    The Hubble's a digital camera, but its images portray truth which a CG image of someone's notion of what things look like out there does not.
    It's really a telescope that can look at the electromagnetic spectrum in different bands than the human eye can see. Shooting IR sensitive film in a film camera with an IR cutoff filter also produces an image that the eye doesn't really see; is THIS not photography?
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 07-12-2012 at 08:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #97

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    Lets just agree on "different strokes for different folks"

    Quote Originally Posted by rolleiman View Post
    but the fact that a picture taken on digital, even though technically superb, often has a "plasticky, surreal" kind of quality about it. Compare this to a black & white film image showing a little grain, but still sharp, and it's the film image that wins for me, every time.
    I REALLY don't want to get into an "A" vs. "D" discussion; lets just say that skill practitioners of either technology will produce great images. Some people enjoy working in the dark with chemicals; others enjoy working with a computer. (As it happens, I (as well as many of you, I expect) enjoy working with both technologies.) If its grain or fine structure you want in a D image, companies like NIK Software have excellent tools.

    Please, lets not compare images from point and shoot, drugstore consumer Dcam users to prints made by skilled users and labs; lets compare apples to apples.

    IMO, film has one major advantage over digital: you can't beat it for archival purposes (what ever that term means to you). Film images are human eye readable and will last for generations.

    The best way to avoid mention of D technology in the Forum is to avoid making any comparisons to it. The analog world doesn't have to justify itself vs. the digital world. Lets just agree on "different strokes for different folks".
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 07-12-2012 at 08:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #98
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    To Prof_Pixel,

    What could be the average price of an Olympus OM-10 by now? And what was the same average price a year ago or two?
    (I agree with you, e-Bay is invaded by professionnal re-seller, so the prices go up quickly.) On the other hand, it sends a message to the camera-makers: there is a need for film camera...

  9. #99

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    Photo-gear,

    I'm sure the prices of used cameras will continue to vary based on the interest of photographers and collectors. I suspect the camera manufacturers are waiting to see what happens to the availability of film. I'm optimistic that quality films will be available for a long time; if this happens, I would expect some camera manufacturers to bring out camera (since the demand will be lower than in the past, prices will be higher).

    I write articles for the Show Daily newspapers published at Photokina, and I'm trying to come up with some articles addressing what's happening to analog photography films and cameras.

  10. #100

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    I believe there actually may be a film revival of sorts going on. I have noticed many of the manual focus cameras and lenses are noticeably higher than not to long ago, even some of the AF cameras are up too, slightly, but not always.

    Just look at KEH these days. I know I spent every day looking at KEH at work at the beginning of the year (hope the boss isn't reading this) and there was always a flood of Nikon everything on there......not so much now. I may stand corrected but even 3 or 4 months ago there was alot more Nikon whatever on KEH and others too. Ok, the digital video guys maybe grabbing some of the MF stuff, but the choice of MF bodies is way way down too. Unless all of us have decided to buy every model of Nikon or Canon camera ever made for our own collection, somebody has got to be buying these to set on a self or they are preparing themselves for a return to film.

    I doubt the first time return to film guy will buy 100 rolls of film to start out....2 or 3 rolls, sit on them while surfing the internet on how and what to take a picture of, and in a couple of months, maybe they will go out and actually take a picture......

    All I know, it is getting harder and harder to get the film I want locally. Just about to start ordering it online.....don't want to, but if Kodak isn't shipping to my local guys, what else can I do?

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

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