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Thread: Film revival

  1. #101
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rolleiman View Post
    A friend, in order to demonstrate the incredible capability of the (then) new Nikon D3 of opening up the shadows in available light photography, had taken a night shot of a churchyard in which every conceivable area of darkness had been opened up to reveal every last bit of detail in the church.
    This is something that is not due to some particular advantage of digital capture, or of that particular camera. You can adopt such an exposure with film as well, and with negative film the dynamic range will certainly be superior to any digital camera, this one mentioned included.

    The "reveal all details" exposure in night photography is, I think, just as "legitimate" as the other choice, the "maintain the chiaroscuro effect" exposure. They are but two different exposure choices, which once again highlight that it is the photographer who must calculate the exposure he wants according to the desired final outcome, and not the camera, because the camera doesn't possess an aesthetic judgement, not even the 20-zones-20millions-case-BS matrix ones.

    I personally like when shadows appear to be blocked but instead, looking at them, there is detail so that "nothing is lost" with the exception of the deepest recesses.

    The highlights of this pictures would had been badly burned if I had taken it with a digital camera while retaining the same shadow detail (which cannot be necessarily appreciated due to the dynamic range of your monitor).

    This is taken on Astia, a slide film. A negative colour film would have digged even more in the shadows and reach more in the highlights.

    http://fineartamerica.com/featured/b...o-ruggeri.html

    EDIT: one can click on the image to see full-resolution squares of the images. In such a situation it is basically impossible, with slides and digital, to really get all highlights and all the shadows. But the transition from detailed, to "washy", to clipped highlights is gentle and gives a pleasant effect. With digital (any) the transition is abrupt which badly underscores the zones where the highlights exceed the dynamic range of the capture technology used.
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 07-13-2012 at 06:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #102
    BobD's Avatar
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    I sell vintage camera equipment at local camera shows (2 per month). Most of the items for sale at these shows are from the film era. The shows are more popular than ever with lots of young people attending, many having never used a film camera before. Some are there to hunt for legacy lenses for their digital cameras but many are there strictly for film gear. Medium format cameras are very popular, especially TLRs. The 35mm SLRs are not so popular except for AE-1s and K1000s and a few others.

  3. #103
    foc
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    I own a minilab/camera shop in the northwest of Ireland, county population 64,000 approx. On the 26th June this year we sold more second hand 35mm film cameras than digital. Was it a local anomaly? Yes but what a good one.

  4. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobD View Post
    I sell vintage camera equipment at local camera shows (2 per month). Most of the items for sale at these shows are from the film era. The shows are more popular than ever with lots of young people attending, many having never used a film camera before. Some are there to hunt for legacy lenses for their digital cameras but many are there strictly for film gear. Medium format cameras are very popular, especially TLRs. The 35mm SLRs are not so popular except for AE-1s and K1000s and a few others.

    I'm not surprised at medium format cameras being very popular at your vintage camera shows. The superb large optical viewfinders on these cameras, must be a revelation to someone who has been limited to the pokey little non-focussing screen on their digital gear.

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