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View Poll Results: Do you prefer 35mm or 50mm focal length in 135 format?

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  • 35mm

    42 48.28%
  • 50mm

    45 51.72%
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  1. #21

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    As much as I love my 50mm I would have to say the 35mm would be the one lens I would use if I could only have one.

  2. #22
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    I usually use a slightly long lens for my cityscapes. I frequently use a 90mm, but of the choices given it has to be 50mm.

  3. #23
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    If I could afford the 35mm f1.4 for my Contax, I'd have that. Since I can't, I'm happy to stick with the 50 f1.4. I like doing portraits with shallow depth of field, and a 50 is the shortest focal length you can get that really starts to give you the spatial compression for a good portrait. Were money no object, I'd have three lenses for my Contax - the 50 1.4, 35 1.4, and 85 1.4.

  4. #24
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    35mm by focal length, but I do seem to shoot 35mm a lot in low light. The fastest 35mm for my Pentax cameras that I'm aware of is f/2 and it's spendy. If I could get a 35 1.4 like you Nikon folks....but then again I imagine those aren't cheap either.
    You should see if the Rokinon/Samyang/Bower 35/1.4 is available in Pentax mount. It's a sweet lens. Manual focus, but at least one of the Nikon versions has all the electronic contacts to satisfy newer, simpler cameras.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  5. #25
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    You should see if the Rokinon/Samyang/Bower 35/1.4 is available in Pentax mount. It's a sweet lens. Manual focus, but at least one of the Nikon versions has all the electronic contacts to satisfy newer, simpler cameras.
    They're selling very strongly in most old and new mounts--very popular on MILCs and DSLRs for still and video. A friend uses the 35/1.4 on his Sony NEX 7--wow! Very nice quality for the $.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Sh...1/N/4294255798

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
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    35mm for me - but then I'm probably influenced by the entire kit I carry most frequently: Zuiko 24mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2.0 and 85mm f/2.0
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27
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    The reason for sticking with one focal length lens has great advantages. The 50mm is probably the closest to the human eye angle of view, discounting peripheral vision. But by sticking with one focal length, it allows you to experiment and realise the infinite possibilities in controlling view within the aspect ratio of the viewfinder, angle and perspective. A few days ago I was in a particular location for a couple of hours. After about an hour I found a viewpoint that I could never have found by just a casual visit to the location. It’s all out there; we just have to have the patience to find it.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #28

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    I do like the 50 but I would go for the 35.

    Jeff

  9. #29

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    35mm

  10. #30

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    Silly me has recently learned how to use my feet to zoom in and out to frame a better photo. I used to never go anything wider than 50mm but again, life changes and I am now starting to move closer to my subjects and finding that I really like the results I am getting out of that 35mm lens I bought some 4 years ago but never used.....

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

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