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  1. #1

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    How much to spend on UV filters

    I want them to really just protect my lenses.

    How much do I need to spend for that?

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    That depends upon how much image degradation you want. The filter will be part of the lens system, so only good quality filters should be used. UV filters cost about the same as other common filters, and there are many available used. I use B&W, Nikon, Hoya HMC, any good make.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Another advantage of the good quality filters is that they tend to be better mechanically - the threads may fit the lens filters more accurately, and if you are fortunate, may be manufactured of materials (brass?) that are less likely to seize.

    That being said, I use both expensive and inexpensive filters - as circumstances dictate. As an example, I would be unlikely to pay for an expensive, new IR filter, as I don't shoot much near-IR work.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
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    I only own one and it comes only when needed (salt spray, mist, flying debris). Don't get Tiffen's, the rings suck. B+W or heliopan.
    I use lens caps to protect my lenses.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  5. #5
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Well, I agree with E. and Matt.

    I have UV filters on all my 35mm lenses, mainly for protection.

    The MF and LF lenses get filters less frequently, primarily because of the different environments in which
    they're used as compared with the 35mm, which get carried around in all sorts of adverse conditions.

    I always buy the best filters I can find; generally those from the camera manufacturer when available, like Nikon or Hasselblad.

    For LF filters I always buy B+W, made in Germany. I think they're the best filters made. My second choice would be Heliopan.

    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh B; 07-14-2012 at 03:06 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  6. #6
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    UV filters really don't do much for "protection" in my own experience. Use your lenscap when not taking a photo. It's a LOT tougher than flimsy glass. I also use my lenshood and that deflects a lot of crud right there. Now, consider this. The only time I had a lens element damaged, the camera (on tripod) was blown over and the lens smacked into the ground. The filter on the lens immediately broke and scratched the HELL out of my lens. If I had the lens cap on there would have been no damage. I was once out with a friend in downtown Chicago, and he tried to put a lens back into a belt pouch. He missed it and the lens fell "face" down onto the sidewalk. His stupid UV filter broke and scratched the hell out of his lens. If he had been using a lens cap instead, he would have had no damage. I have lenses from 1847, 1854, 1855, 1865....1906, 1922, .....1951 and none of them have ever had a filter on them. They are all perfect. None of my Nikon lenses have filters on them; they are all perfect despite hard use outdooors almost daily. If I were to put a quality UV filter on all four of my best Nikon lenses, the cost would actually be MORE than a repair! Use your lens cap for protection and don't worry about it. If you are relying on a flimsy piece of glass to "protect" you lens, you are putting it more at risk not less.


    Kent in SD

  7. #7
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    If I had a dollar for every old wives' tale about a filter breaking and damaging a lens...

    That's certainly a ridiculous reason to avoid using a filter.

    If you're that concerned, don't take your lens outdoors in the first place and you won't need to worry.

    As to tripods blowing over or missing a lens pouch when you're working... Pay attention to what you're doing.
    The lenses were damaged by operator stupidity, not by the presence of a filter.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  8. #8

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    I only buy multi-coated ones from Hoya or Nikon.

    For most of my lenses, I use Nikon NC filter which is multi-coated but not UV. For front element protection, this is perfect. They are reasonably priced also.

    Let's not turn this thread into yet another use or not use filters. It's certainly for each individual to decide.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9
    Two23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I only buy multi-coated ones from Hoya or Nikon.

    For most of my lenses, I use Nikon NC filter which is multi-coated but not UV. For front element protection, this is perfect. They are reasonably priced also.

    Let's not turn this thread into yet another use or not use filters. It's certainly for each individual to decide.


    I won't turn it into yet another thread, but you can rest assured that it DID happen to me, and I DID see it happen to another guy. This is direct info, not an old wive's tale. The damage was very clearly done BY the filter in both instances.



    Kent in SD

  10. #10
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    The damage was very clearly done BY the filter in both instances.
    The damage was clearly done by the USER in both instances. Careless work habits and inattention can damge anything.

    I've used filters on every 35mm lens I've owned over the last 50+ years, and have NEVER damaged a lens, not even one.

    So what's the difference? It's simple... I pay attention to what I'm doing.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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