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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I wouldn't use any.

    The basis of one camera, one lens, one film philosophy is to simplify your gear and concentrate on composition and techniques. Adding a filter complicates this.

    If you must use a filter, I suggest yellow. It renders sky more naturally then without. If you are shooting in low light situations and using Delta 3200, obviously, sky isn't part of the scene. I wouldn't use any filters.

    I know this isn't what you asked, but if I am going to stick to one film, I'd choose something more generic, like ISO 400 films - unless you are going to exclusively shoot low light images.
    I concur fully and would like to add that I personally seldom use filters. When people use filters they tend to overuse them. It is helpful to remember that in photography there is always a price to be paid. A filter adds two additional surfaces to the optical path. Even with the very best filters there is some degradation of the image.

    If you decide to use a filter then buy the very best quality. If you use wide angle lenses you will need a filter with a curved surface to avoid further distrotion.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I wouldn't use any.

    The basis of one camera, one lens, one film philosophy is to simplify your gear and concentrate on composition and techniques. Adding a filter complicates this.

    If you must use a filter, I suggest yellow. It renders sky more naturally then without. If you are shooting in low light situations and using Delta 3200, obviously, sky isn't part of the scene. I wouldn't use any filters.

    I know this isn't what you asked, but if I am going to stick to one film, I'd choose something more generic, like ISO 400 films - unless you are going to exclusively shoot low light images.
    Thanks to all for advice!

    I used HP5 (EI320) as my only film for about two years and often found myself in situations where a tripod was required, hence my choice of Delta 3200. I will probably rate this film somewhere between 1000-1600. For years I had an old Pentax ES with a 50mm as my only camera and learned quite a lot from that. On the other hand I've never been any good at judging when and why to use filters which is why I would like to extend the "one of everything"-philosophy.

  3. #13
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    I've never found a use for a green filter, although I have such for the Nikon and Hasselblad.

    Green will lighten foliage, but if I want that I'll shoot infra-red and get a much more dramatic effect.

    What am I missing?

    - Leigh
    I use it for foliage when I do not want such a dramatic effect. Good for portraits too though.
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    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

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  4. #14
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I shoot exclusively black&white in large format 4x5 and 8x10 (some 35mm and MF work is in color, not relevant to this thread).

    When I use filters, it's usually as an experiment, rather than trying to get a specific look. I might take a dozen or more shots of the same scene using different filters and exposures, just to see how much variation I can get of the same subject.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I wouldn't use any.

    The basis of one camera, one lens, one film philosophy is to simplify your gear and concentrate on composition and techniques. Adding a filter complicates this.
    I agree and I respectfully disagree. The idea behind one camera, one lens is definitely to limit your options and to force you to look at ALL your composition options and creative techniques. I would suggest that adding filters enhances those composition options, not complicates it.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    If you must use a filter, I suggest yellow. It renders sky more naturally then without. If you are shooting in low light situations and using Delta 3200, obviously, sky isn't part of the scene. I wouldn't use any filters.
    I do agree, filters are not usually the first choice in low light photography. But filtering can still be useful in low light, and sky may be part of the reason. By using a graduated ND filter you can reduce the light coming from the sky which allows you to increase the light coming in from the rest of the scene without necessarily losing some of those nifty cloud patterns that you may want to include, or blowing it out all together.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I know this isn't what you asked, but if I am going to stick to one film, I'd choose something more generic, like ISO 400 films - unless you are going to exclusively shoot low light images.
    Actually, I have been looking closely at Delta 3200 myself. It appears to be a very versatile film and should be capable of holding up to overexposures all the way to ISO 400. I haven't personally played around with this yet but I have picked up a few rolls to see how well it works at various ISO settings. It is certainly intriguing. I'll probably find out I am all wet on this one, I usually am, but it is going to be great fun finding out.

    Far from seeing people over use filters, I don't think most people think about them at all, or at least not much. It is certainly important to have a specific purpose for your filter, maybe all you want to do is see what impact it has. I think filters are a terrific option if you want to achieve a certain look and if you are not sure what that look will be, experiment away. I definitely agree that you are introducing another couple of glass surfaces to the light path, so you want to be using good, multi-coated filters. But the purpose for most of my images is not sharpness, it is the image, and filters can frequently enhance that.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I wouldn't use any.

    The basis of one camera, one lens, one film philosophy is to simplify your gear and concentrate on composition and techniques. Adding a filter complicates this.
    A man after my own heart, but probably the most useful filter is a double polariser which can also be used a variable ND filter.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #17
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    1) #22 Orange... and its really orange... none of this wimpy half orange stuff... real orange
    2) #29 Red .... real red.... really !! not a 25 . a 29.... get used to it... dark red... RED
    3) #1 close up should do the job.
    Give 2 stops for the #22 and 3 stops for the #29 nothing less.... make those skies sing.
    Logan

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    The basis of one camera, one lens, one film philosophy is to simplify your gear and concentrate on composition and techniques. Adding a filter complicates this.
    Simplcity is a good thing but actually for me the "one film/camera" idea is about really about understanding the tools and media and being able to make them do whatever you darn well please to get the final result you want.

    Delta 3200 can be shot from EI 400 to 12500 without even straying away from the directions.

    Modifying it's response to color with filters is just part of learning the film.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    When I bring three filters, they're usually medium yellow, orange, and a polarizer. I find red too dramatic for most situations.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    I find red too dramatic for most situations.
    This is exactly the reason I suggest shooting various filters.

    Everyone's vision is different, and thus the reaction to various filtration results and effects will be different.

    You don't know what you like until you try the whole range, then select whatever works best for you.

    You'll never find out if you don't experiment in the first place.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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