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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaihc View Post
    I'd like to learn how to use the color filters first, keeping things simple and choices limited. In one year I use approx. 30-50 rolls of film, which is not that much.
    Polarizers are really easy to use. It will take you all of 5 minutes to learn how to use it. You just spin it to get your desired effect. You can actually see what is going on while while looking through your viewfinder so you can practice with it without shooting a single frame of film.

    Whlle looking at a lake or glass store front spin the filter until the reflections "magically" disappear in your viewfinder.

    While looking at a sunny seen spin the filter and the sky will "magically" get darker or lighter. Stop when the sky looks the way you want it and snap the shutter. How dark the sky will get depends on where the sun is at the time. Of course you will see all this while looking through your viewfinder before you ever take the shot.

    I'm telling you this because I think in a year from now you will be "kicking" yourself for not buying a polarizer sooner.

  2. #42

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    Sorry that's scene not seen. I should wear my glasses while I type!

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    Polarizers are really easy to use. It will take you all of 5 minutes to learn how to use it. You just spin it to get your desired effect. You can actually see what is going on while while looking through your viewfinder so you can practice with it without shooting a single frame of film.

    Whlle looking at a lake or glass store front spin the filter until the reflections "magically" disappear in your viewfinder.

    While looking at a sunny seen spin the filter and the sky will "magically" get darker or lighter. Stop when the sky looks the way you want it and snap the shutter. How dark the sky will get depends on where the sun is at the time. Of course you will see all this while looking through your viewfinder before you ever take the shot.

    I'm telling you this because I think in a year from now you will be "kicking" yourself for not buying a polarizer sooner.
    Thanks for your concern! I actually already have a polarizer and have used it occasionally with my other (d)SLR. What worries me is rather that I might be spending even more time with it and not learning the color filters properly. It might be a good idea, though, to bring it along and compare it's effect with the color filters. This means taking more pictures of the same subject and jotting down more notes, but I guess that is the whole point of my experiment anyway.

  4. #44
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    As regards filters for black & white photography...

    The purpose of color (more correctly contrast-control) filters is to remove portions of the visible spectrum,
    thus darkening objects of that color.

    Proper use depends on knowing the three primary colors (Red, Green, and Blue) and their compliments:
    Red <-> Cyan (= Green + Blue)
    Green <-> Magenta (= Red + Blue)
    Blue <-> Yellow (= Red + Green)

    For example, a Yellow filter attenuates (darkens) Blue, so such filters are used to darken a blue sky
    and increase the contrast between the sky and the clouds.

    Most contrast filters are available in different grades, such as Light Red, Medium Red, and Dark Red,
    producing a more dramatic effect as the grade increases.

    Some people think that colored filters "brighten" their own color, but that's just a consequence of applying
    the "filter factor", as specified for each filter, which increases the overall exposure of the film.

    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh B; 07-16-2012 at 04:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  5. #45
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Regarding polarizers...

    They do not work with specular reflections, such as you get from shiny metal like chrome automobile trim.

    They do not work on windows if the camera is pointed directly at the window. Your view must be at an angle.
    The same is true of water reflections, but you're seldom looking straight down at water.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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