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  1. #1
    dj_judas21's Avatar
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    Mamiya-Sekor E 50mm f/1.7 needs lubricating

    I've just bought a Mamiya-Sekor E 50mm f/1.7, which is in tip-top condition, except that the lubricant seems to have gone hard. The focus ring is extremely stiff. I want to clean out the old gunk and replace it with new lubricant but I don't know how to take this lens apart safely, and so far I haven't found much online.

    Has anyone else had experience with this lens?

    Thanks,
    Jonathan

  2. #2
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    I regularly take apart lenses and could easily do this with yours. You have to first remove the center logo ring around the front element. I have said before that only Nikon had the sense to go easy on the lubricant; there is little to 'dry up' with their lenses. If you could see how much gunk is on your helical you would be disgusted!

    If you are by any chance near Philadelphia I could do this for you for about five bucks. My land line is 215.569.4949 in case you have further questions.

    The 'normal' lenses, from any manufacturer, are especially easy to take apart in most cases, especially the Minoltas and the Pentaxes. The Canon are a bit troublesome. Most M42, as you have, are rather straightforward. The problem here is usually not the helical, per se, but rather the thin thread circular disk that mounts the helical to the body. That thread needs to be thouroughly degreased. - David Lyga

    SORRY DJ, you are across the pond!

  3. #3
    dj_judas21's Avatar
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    Thanks for your response, David. As you spotted, I'm in the UK!

    I can't see how the front centre logo ring comes off - there are no visible set screws. All the screws seem to be on the back face of the lens, where it contacts the body of the camera.

    I've taken apart an Industar-26m for lubrication before and that was a breeze. Gotta love that Soviet simplicity! This Mamiya sample seems to be a bit trickier. I took off the inner rear ring (with the electric contacts) and that was easy enough, but all of the screws on the outer ring were stuck and I couldn't get them to move. Not having a great deal of success!

  4. #4

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    You need a rubber `tube' or such to screw the front ring of.Just in case you have a wine barrel in the shed i can tell you that the rubber bung from a wine barrel is just the right size...:-)

  5. #5

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    Like this, turn anti clockwise with pressure against logo ring.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    DJ, I do things rather crudely because I am too cheap to buy the proper tools. I take two tiny bits of duct tape and fold them each over a couple of times with sticky side out. Then I place each on the logo ring surrounding the front element, about 180 degrees apart. I then take a pointed pair of scissors and position each end on each piece of the duct tape. Then, carefully, I turn the ring counterclockwise to get it started and getting it loose. After that I can usually turn by hand, but there are annoying occasions where the filter ring is dented and the logo ring will not screw off so easily. In those instances I must use pliers to straighten the filter ring and even then sometimes I end up having to drill two tiny holes into the ring, again 180 degrees apart, and force off the ring with the scissors. Not fun.

    Depending upon the lens, after the logo ring is off there might be screws holding the filter ring which have to be removed. Or there might be another 'spanner ring' to remove by the same pointed scissors. I forget the exact way the Mamiya lens is put together but I do know that it is easy to do. Unfortunately you are about 3000 miles away but maybe an Olympic discus thrower can aim from London to Philadelphia and accurately target my waiting hand.

    Sorry for the delay with my response but I do not have a computer at home. - David Lyga

    NOTA BENE: Craig, doesn't the turn have to be COUNTERclockwise? I have never met a filter ring that turned other than normally. Sorry, you prefaced the clockwise with 'anti' so you are technically correct, but, perhaps, 'counterclockwise' is a bit more intuitive.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Swensson View Post
    Like this, turn anti clockwise with pressure against logo ring.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yes , major typo...counter clockwise...sorry for that, depends on whose english you are used to..:-)

  8. #8
    dj_judas21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Swensson View Post
    Yes , major typo...counter clockwise...sorry for that, depends on whose english you are used to..:-)
    in British English, it's "anti-clockwise", but we still understand "counter clockwise". Thanks for your tip, anyway. I've been too busy to try it this week, but hopefully I'll find some time at the weekend...



 

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