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  1. #41
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Interesting thread. Pardon me for saying this but easiest way to find out is to put the lens onto digital body, take two shots at 70 & 210mm, with same flash setting and same camera to object distance. Then crop the 70mm to get the same field of view of the 210mm and finally check the histogram.
    Yes but you have to set the camera in manual mode or the camera (digital or film doesn't make any difference) will compensate for the light loss.
    But then, a histogram is not a "number" so it doesn't give you an idea of how much you have to compensate when using an external light meter.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Interesting thread. Pardon me for saying this but easiest way to find out is to put the lens onto digital body, take two shots at 70 & 210mm, with same flash setting and same camera to object distance. Then crop the 70mm to get the same field of view of the 210mm and finally check the histogram.
    I'll just stick whichever prime lens I think suits the scene on my Nikon, meter with my handheld meter, and expose the frame with utter confidence.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Yes but you have to set the camera in manual mode or the camera (digital or film doesn't make any difference) will compensate for the light loss.
    But then, a histogram is not a "number" so it doesn't give you an idea of how much you have to compensate when using an external light meter.
    Histogram actually gives you more accurate number you just need to know the camera dynamic range and divide the histogram by how many stops you have.

  4. #44
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    You might try adaptall-2.org as they give lots of information on Tamron lenses.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Histogram actually gives you more accurate number you just need to know the camera dynamic range and divide the histogram by how many stops you have.
    I see what you mean but does it work considering that the histogram is drawn after the gamma curve is applied and the data is non-linear any more?
    Or is there a way to have the histogram of the "raw" file?
    In my digital camera the histogram refers to the in-camera JPEG which naturally has the curves applied by the internal engine.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  6. #46

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    You must have a curve although it could be a straight line before you can have histogram.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    I see what you mean but does it work considering that the histogram is drawn after the gamma curve is applied and the data is non-linear any more?
    Or is there a way to have the histogram of the "raw" file?
    In my digital camera the histogram refers to the in-camera JPEG which naturally has the curves applied by the internal engine.
    Umm that's a good point but I think is not a significant issue since we are not comparing two digicams with different algorithms. That will be way off the analog photography area. My thought is just so he/she can use more accurate measurement for the vari-aperture lens and to save film lab time and cost.

  8. #48
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    I had two variable aperture zoom lenses that I sold and replaced with constant aperture ones because they weren't worth the hassle and mental arithmetic.
    Ben

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