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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    That's why Leicas are so expensive

    It's hand made. The camera is out of my league, but I can appreciate why there so expensive.

    http://www.humansinvent.com/#!/8687/...-a-leica-lens/
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    It's hand made. The camera is out of my league, but I can appreciate why there so expensive.

    http://www.humansinvent.com/#!/8687/...-a-leica-lens/

    You mean "it's hand made, not by underpaid asian labour", as the rest of the gear is...
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    It's hand made. The camera is out of my league, but I can appreciate why there so expensive.

    http://www.humansinvent.com/#!/8687/...-a-leica-lens/
    It's hand assembled, not hand made.

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    I've had good experiences with Leica equipment, but in general I don't believe in hand made at this point. I'm sorry but given the level of precision possible in computer controlled machining and assembly, hand made is now much more about marketing and snobbery than the actual performance of the product. I have been very disappointed many times with the quality of premium hand made items with big price tags.

  5. #5
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    You're probably right

    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    You mean "it's hand made, not by underpaid asian labour", as the rest of the gear is...
    I was in Vietnam this summer and I saw a Canon plant on a bus to the Ku Chi tunnels. The Vietnamese make about $150 per month. I think also, the Japanese are possibly more automated than German manufacturers.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I was in Vietnam this summer and I saw a Canon plant on a bus to the Ku Chi tunnels. The Vietnamese make about $150 per month. I think also, the Japanese are possibly more automated than German manufacturers.
    Sounds about right, I've heard about salaries that are around 20-30 EUR per week, so that is round about the same then.
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I've had good experiences with Leica equipment, but in general I don't believe in hand made at this point. I'm sorry but given the level of precision possible in computer controlled machining and assembly, hand made is now much more about marketing and snobbery than the actual performance of the product. I have been very disappointed many times with the quality of premium hand made items with big price tags.
    Most "premium hand-made products" exist only in the mind of the ad copywriter. The highest quality products are those made using the highest quality techniques - computer controlled machining to save man-hours, coupled with hand assembly and inspection where applicable. Like Leica does it.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Most "premium hand-made products" exist only in the mind of the ad copywriter. The highest quality products are those made using the highest quality techniques - computer controlled machining to save man-hours, coupled with hand assembly and inspection where applicable. Like Leica does it.....
    This nails it. I've been in the machining industry for ~20 years, and there is just no match for the speed, precision, or consistency of computerized individual component manufacturing. But having said that, there are still some operations that are just too delicate for anything but skilled human hands. It's that extra 5 or 10% that separates an assembled product from a crafted one, and the difference is often quite noticeable.

    Also, and perhaps more importantly, designing products for hand assembly gives engineers much more latitude in design. When designing for automated assembly, or rapid assembly on a line, the same level of fit and finish simply cannot be held, even if the techniques to make the individual parts would support it. Rapid assembly simply does not allow itself the ability for close tolerances, hand fitting, 100% quality control, complex assemblies, or other fine tuning techniques. Concessions must be made in a more "design for manufacture" environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteZ8 View Post
    This nails it. I've been in the machining industry for ~20 years, and there is just no match for the speed, precision, or consistency of computerized individual component manufacturing. But having said that, there are still some operations that are just too delicate for anything but skilled human hands. It's that extra 5 or 10% that separates an assembled product from a crafted one, and the difference is often quite noticeable.

    Also, and perhaps more importantly, designing products for hand assembly gives engineers much more latitude in design. When designing for automated assembly, or rapid assembly on a line, the same level of fit and finish simply cannot be held, even if the techniques to make the individual parts would support it. Rapid assembly simply does not allow itself the ability for close tolerances, hand fitting, 100% quality control, complex assemblies, or other fine tuning techniques. Concessions must be made in a more "design for manufacture" environment.
    Your're not very far from Lancaster, where the finest quantity-produced watches ever made anywhere, at any time, at any price, were made. Hamilton used automated machinery coupled with hand assembly and selective fitting to produce (among other things) the Hamilton marine chronometer which is regarded by many as the most accurate portable mechanical timekeeper ever made. And it was made under wartime emergency production. 70 years ago.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 09-05-2012 at 01:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Other than the cache´and the mystique of Leica, are the lenses and cameras that much better? I've never shot with a Leica before. Any opinions?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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