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  1. #1

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    Could this kill film for good?

    Here is a link to a new development from Hitachi, the Japanese electronics company. They have developed a glass memory device that is suppose to last a million years. No film can do that nor can any CD. Read about it here...

    http://phys.org/news/2012-09-japan-hitachi.html

    Enjoy, Ric.

  2. #2
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Really archival memory is a great development if it pans out, but of course it won't kill film. Ink jet prints already last longer than chromogenic color ones but color isn't dead. Film is a choice based on aesthetic and process. The until-now archival advantage (for black and white only) and lack of need for a specialized machine to read it are nice, but they are not integral to choosing film over digital, or even very important reasons for most of us.

  3. #3

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    How is it intended to kill film exactly as I can't even use it on any of my film cameras?
    • It requires some device to use it - I can simply look at my film.
    • It's just a method to store digital data - I can simply open my film cases.


    And of course it doesn't fit any of my film cameras!

  4. #4

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    Do we really produce anything worth keeping for million years?

    Plus, I'm in agreement with Les on visual aspect. Almost all recent technology involve encoding visual image to some kind of form that will require special device to read and an algorithm to decode so we can turn them back into visual images. How are we going to keep those hundreds of different encoding method and reading devices for millions of years? I think we really have a problem here. In few millenniums, future generation won't know much about us, unlike the way we know about our ancestors.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ric Trexell View Post
    Here is a link to a new development from Hitachi, the Japanese electronics company. They have developed a glass memory device that is suppose to last a million years. No film can do that nor can any CD.
    It's not a film killer because it isn't human eye readable. Since it requires special hardware to read, what you have is a WOM (Write only memory) with a million year life. Big deal.

  6. #6
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    Seeing how the entire history of the written word spans mere 10 centuries or so now,
    their claim is a nice example of hypothetical conjecture or as we used to say,

    "God willin' and the creek don't rise..."

    There are many threats to film, the worst to my mind being the rising cost of silver as a commodity...
    remember the Hunt brothers?

    in 20 years, you won't even be able to read a CD-ROM, cause no one will have the antiquated drive/drivers
    needed to read one [forget 5.25" disks, how many still have a floppy reader?]... except a few nerds

  7. #7
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dasBlute View Post
    [forget 5.25" disks, how many still have a floppy reader?]
    Hey! I do!

    Quote Originally Posted by dasBlute View Post
    ... except a few nerds
    Uh... no I don't...

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #8

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    I got some VHS tapes.... Now I don't even own a TV.... Who killed VHS, the greatest format ever!?

    On the other hand, I also own lots of books from 1970s. I can still read'em with my own eyes....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    What is worth keeping for a million years?
    Very especially since we're not likely to exist around that time...

    What we should be concerned about is how long our film will keep for in ideal conditions as opposed to the ambitions of digital; I doubt very, very much that any digital photograph produced today will be readable in 20 to 30 years. Whether we will still have film then is a matter of conjecture. Whatever we have in a million years will not concern me.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I got some VHS tapes.... Now I don't even own a TV.... Who killed VHS, the greatest format ever!?
    Everyone knows Beta was better . . .

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