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  1. #121

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    Can someone summarize the advantages of 35mm over MF/LF out of 12/13 pages in one post please?

  2. #122
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    Can someone summarize the advantages of 35mm over MF/LF out of 12/13 pages in one post please?
    You are welcome to try.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    Can someone summarize the advantages of 35mm over MF/LF out of 12/13 pages in one post please?
    Advantages for both MF and LF

    * Larger negative means less magnification needed for larger prints.
    * Less visible grain.
    * Interesting choice of image formats (6x4.5, 6x6, 6x7, 6x9, 6x12, 6x17, 4x5, 5x7, etc)

    For LF:

    * LOTS of perspective control via camera movments
    * Contact prints are large enough to hang if you shoot 5x7 and up

    Disadvantages:

    * Equipment is heavier in most cases
    * Max 16 shots per roll of film
    * Lenses are slower and there are less options for available light shooting

    For mainly LF

    * Enlarging 5x7 and over is an expensive proposition
    * Film cost is much more
    * Messing with film holders means that you work at a much slower pace for the most part.
    * Finding decent daylight developing solutions for 4x5 and up that don't require huge sums of money take a certain knowledge of rocket science and perhaps wizardry (kind kidding here...and kind of not)

    I'm sure others will think of things, but this sums up for me. I chose to make the disadvantages into advantages for the most part.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  4. #124
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    Think about all the arguments that people have been making in favor of d.....l for the last few years and that about sums it up.

  5. #125

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    Just use the the right tool for the job. What was the question again?

  6. #126
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    LF and MF are quite often tripod based, giving limited movements of the camera, which may be fine for a static scene. However, I remember seeing a shot in Valencia which made me sprint to the location distance I wanted and once there I could adjust my angle/height to the exact composition I wanted (all in a very short time frame). This my overiding consideration for preference of 35mm.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    LF and MF are quite often tripod based, giving limited movements of the camera, which may be fine for a static scene. However, I remember seeing a shot in Valencia which made me sprint to the location distance I wanted and once there I could adjust my angle/height to the exact composition I wanted (all in a very short time frame). This my overiding consideration for preference of 35mm.

    I don't see how that can put 35mm head and shoulders in front of MF and LF, especially since MF and LF have bigger images, better resolultion and more flexibility in framing — automation is not needed; its endemic to 35mm and a very small number of MF cameras, and entirely absence on LF. You could have actually done exactly the same sprint and height adjustment with MF, but not particularly well with LF!

    The majority of my EOS1N shots were tripod-mounted; I rarely used it 'freehand'. The quality of all those images speak for themselves: no hand-held blur or shake anywhere. All my 6x7 shots are tripod based, as are pinhole shots. No big deal to me to dock camera to tripod and undock and move on; been doing that for 26 years at least.

    Remember that one format camera is not going to be universally suitable for all subject matter, especially as skills and diversity build up over time.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #128
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Tripods should quite often be used with any camera, reducing movement of the camera, which normally improves photos markedly. I remember seeing a shot in Utah which made me sprint to the location distance I wanted and once there my monopod kept the camera from wobbling uncontrollably in my shaking hands. This is my overiding consideration for my preference for camera support regardless of format.

    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I don't see how that can put 35mm head and shoulders in front of MF and LF, especially since MF and LF have bigger images, better resolultion and more flexibility in framing
    Remember that one format camera is not going to be universally suitable for all subject matter, especially as skills and diversity build up over time.
    I agree that one format is not going to be universally suitable for all subject matter. But how can you claim LF and MF (given tripod mount) give more flexibility for framing?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #130

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    Not so sure about slower lenses and fewer options for available light shooting. I used a roll of Ilford Pan F in my ETR hand-held a few weeks ago, wasn't hard to keep the shutter speed up around 1/60-1/125 and the aperture around f5.6-f11.

    As for lenses my 50mm and 75mm are both f2.8, that's only a stop slower than the 50mm f1.4 most 35mm systems have as a premium lens. I can shoot with those two and my 150mm and 200mm lenses hand-held even on overcast days with a roll of HP5 in the back. Shutter speed around 1/250 and apertures around f8-f5.6.

    What 35mm does better is telephoto, and this is where available light does come in. I have a 200mm lens for my ETR system but even with the 2x teleconverter it's still only equivalent to something around a 240mm lens on 35mm, and you need strong sunlight even with Ilford HP5 as your maximum aperture works out at f9 or so with the TC taking two stops away. I usually try to shoot a stop or two down from wide open as most lenses perform better there, so now you're looking for conditions to support 1/500 at f16. This doesn't generally happen for most of the year here!
    Matt



 

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