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  1. #31

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    I recently acquired an ugly (though fully functional) Contax RTS from KEH on the bay thing for $79 American dollars. It was on a whim. My previous three cameras had been a magnesium C-1, a 4x5 Wisner Tech Field and a Koni-Omegaflex. The RTS is the first electronic camera I have ever owned. I am truly enjoying using the aperture priority automation. It is very freeing to me. I am certain that many here would laugh uproariously at my calling this automation.

    One cool thing about the RTS or any pro-level body is knowing that there exist every accessory needed for any situation. I have already fallen deeply in love with the Zeiss glass. I doubt I could ever learn to enjoy any camera with an integral motor drive, though it is nice knowing one can be added. The RTS is big and heavy and loud in a "twangy" sort of way, but seems a good balance to me. It is also very pretty, even in my beat-up example. If it dies I can pick up another one (maybe even an RTS II [I know I would like the 97% finder and TTL flash, less sure about the shutter speed dial locking on 'A' and '60']) for a song.

  2. #32
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I don't know anything about digital but why would that make any difference in how many exposures are made? You need to make more exposure because most of the shots on the digital camera won't come out? Same with the pro/high end automatic camera? Do you would need to make more exposures because with the auto-everything systems most of the images won't be any good?

  3. #33

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    Like everyone here I'm a film shooter at heart, so with that film-camera / digital-camera choice already made I guess I choose my modern EOS-1v for the same reasons a "modern" digital shooter would use their digital SLR. That is, when I need auto-everything it's my camera of choice. For example I love candid portraits, so when shooting my little kids I can capture more fleeting moments and get heaps more keepers with the EOS-1v thanks to its auto focus, auto exposure, etc, than I would with my older classics. Same with shooting candids of drivers and teams in the pits at motorsport events, which is another passion of mine. In other words, these modern cameras are great tools for reliability (regarding exposure, focus, etc) in spontaneous situations. Other factors such as the availability of brand new lenses, etc, are a plus too.

    For my other more slow-paced shooting I do much prefer the enjoyment I get from my Pentax Spotmatic, my Mamiya C330F and my Wollensak Stereo 10. The EOS-1v is a high quality tool; the classics are a passion.

  4. #34
    munz6869's Avatar
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    My 1v is useful for events, with it's system flash connectivity, speed and general awesomeness. And it's nice and heavy, so if things turn ugly, it's a useful defensive weapon when you don't have your 5x4" press camera with you...

    Marc!
    Marc Morel
    photographie argentique!
    ------------
    http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/

  5. #35

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    Sep 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viggi View Post
    On and off I research various cameras on the internet, and I've GAS'ed over Nikon F4/F5 (and read up on F6 and F100) as well some high-end Contax (RX mainly). I have a few 35mm cameras and all except Nikon F80 and Hexar AF are manual focus and mechanical (like the Nikon FM2n). The F80 doesn't partner FM2n too well because the former won't support the older lenses. So, I might pick up an F100 instead or an F4. But in this digital age, why get these fast, automatic film cameras? I'm not going to fire an F5 off at 8fps. Just use digital kit for that. For those of us who use film, it seems it should be more of a thai-chi type photography, mainly in B&W; enjoying the feel of the camera, honing your skills and understanding of exposure, and getting that film look we love. The Nikon F6 should be in nowhere-land - not much nostalgia attached to it and truly superseded by the digital revolution. I can see why you'd like to use the more recent film cameras - they are most likely more reliable, but one could also pick up Nikon FM3a, which went out of production in 2006.

    So why do you use F6, F5, or other high-end film cameras such Minolta 7, 9 or Canon equivalent?
    Some of us don't like digital and don't need to expose many frames per second.

  6. #36

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    Apr 2011
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    What I like about my Pentax PZ-20

    I can run it in full auto - AF, Programmed AE (six different programs). I can also select any or all of the following parameters:

    • Film Speed - I can override the DX setting - useful for pushing or using films that aren't DX coded
    • Shutter/Aperture combo - program modes have a shift mode so I can bias toward higher or lower shutter speeds, bigger or smaller apertures.
    • Shutter speed - it has shutter priority mode
    • Aperture - it has aperture priority mode (this is the one I use most often)
    • It has a metered manual mode too
    • I can turn AF off if I want and focus manually
    • I can change the drive mode from single-shot to burst mode, and it also has a self timer.


    I went to a state park about an hour away from my home a few days ago. There was a gentleman there with his family who had a Pentax DSLR. He asked me to take his family's picture. I looked down at the top panel of the camera and noticed he had it set on aperture priority AE. I said "Finally, someone who doesn't have their camera set on full auto!"

    He replied "My wife 'yells' at me for that. She says it makes things more complicated." It doesn't make things more complicated, it gives the photographer more control to do creative things. That's what I like about SLRs that you just don't get with a P&S.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  7. #37

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    Apr 2011
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    At this point in my life, I have to have AF if I want a descent picture of one of the kids (or grand kids) running around the house or yard. Just cannot do it with a MF camera anymore.

    The automation (or the part of the automation I use) is what allows me to get the picture I would not have been able to get in the first place with MF. Believe me, I have tried.

    For me, I have found that kid (people too) photography is where my heart is. Not really motivated to get the landscape shot or something like that. Can't really do it well, perhaps that's why. Working on it though.

    Getting that intimate, candid, and natural photo of a kid engaged in life is what gets my photo blood going. I have got to get out and shoot more!!

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

  8. #38

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    Mar 2012
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    While I like shooting with my Diacord and OM cameras, I use the Contax G2 when in want to take a single camera or where it counts.

    Perfect automatic film take up and advance, fast AF, , 1/8000 shutter speed, TTL Flash, modern metering, superb modern lenses, DX encoding for when I am lazy and do not want to mess up a roll, etc.

  9. #39
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I don't know that I'd call the meter in the G2 'modern', but it is highly competent. It's basically highly center-weighted off a gray strip on the shutter curtain. In some ways it's even less sophisticated than the Olympus OM shutter curtain metering pattern, which looks like that digital camouflage pattern on modern military uniforms. But it has never let me down in the shots I've taken with it, so I can't complain.

  10. #40

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    Ya... "modern" is an intereting term. I still consider my F3 to be modern even though it is 30 years old.

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