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  1. #41

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    Answer: fast moving targets. I love my OM-series cameras, but focusing by hand with 300mm lens on a bird -- well, I'm not really up to that task. With F100 I hope to have some hope of doing wildlife photography without resorting to d*****l SLRs. Autofocus, shutter priority, optical vibration reduction, fill flash...

    To be honest, it feels good to have a really modern film camera. Kind of reminds me that modern camera technology and film tech can work together towards common goal.

  2. #42
    Viggi's Avatar
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    While I feel no (or very little) passion for modern cameras, I do sometimes feel the need for that ease of use. That's why I keep a dslr and a compact digital. On general, the enjoyment and passion for photography is tied up with the mechanical camera and film. But I think I'm limiting myself. That's why I'm considering having something like an f100 or f5 along with my other stuff. I know I can shoot more easily, they are most likely more reliable, and I can still shoot film.

  3. #43
    PDH
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    I usally shoot with a number of 42mm bodies or Mirandas , but I do have a Sigma SA9 and SA7 which has most of the features of a N90, not the build quailty. I like the auto bracket, mirror lockup, and matrix metering or spot metering for shooting landscapes. Sometimes I think about a F100 or F5, but for the most part my Sigmas work well as I am not beating them to death.

  4. #44
    snegron's Avatar
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    I find that developing film is costing more each day. Blazing through a roll in high speed mode is fun but expensive. My fastest film camera is a Nikon F100. I take advantage of the AF and its reliability being a newer camera. I use it in aperture priority mode; same as I do with my F3HP.

    On the other end of the spectrum, if I am going to take my time to shoot in full manual mode (like with my F or F2A), I feel it will be a better idea to shoot with one of my Mamiya 645's or RB67. My logic is that I will get a much better image with 120 film over 35mm film, so If I am going to shoot fully manual why not get the best possible results?

  5. #45
    heterolysis's Avatar
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    I have an F80 and love it. It has plenty of bells and whistles that I don't use or understand, but there are two key features it has that my Nikkormat and MF don't: AF and bracketing. I don't always use either, but they are very handy nonetheless.

    AF is great, but I detest scrolling around to change my AF points, so I often rely on manual focusing still. No problem. And I like to bracket. Whether to test out a new film or to get three different exposures of a shot I really like, it's handy to have. I can try to "see" my finished product, but my brain is not beyond making mistakes. Quick and automated bracketing gives me a safeguard when it matters most.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I don't know that I'd call the meter in the G2 'modern', but it is highly competent. It's basically highly center-weighted off a gray strip on the shutter curtain. In some ways it's even less sophisticated than the Olympus OM shutter curtain metering pattern, which looks like that digital camouflage pattern on modern military uniforms. But it has never let me down in the shots I've taken with it, so I can't complain.
    lol...well, it is no matrix metering, thats right. But then, even the M9 does it that way

    regarding cost: a used F100 costs a great deal less than used D700 cost. The difference buys you a lot of film.
    And with a Tetenal kit developing C41 is not that expensive really. Buying larger quantities of film (especially cheap but decent film like Superia 200) reduces cost. I got 100 rolls of Superia 200 for €1,-- a roll for example.
    Last edited by kanzlr; 10-10-2012 at 02:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #47
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I've recently bought into a few later model Canon EOS bodies. Not the very top end, but high/mid range.

    It is fun to be able to use lots of fancy features, including eye controlled auto-focus when you can get it for less than $50.00 for an almost pristine camera body.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viggi View Post
    While I feel no (or very little) passion for modern cameras, I do sometimes feel the need for that ease of use. That's why I keep a dslr and a compact digital. On general, the enjoyment and passion for photography is tied up with the mechanical camera and film. But I think I'm limiting myself. That's why I'm considering having something like an f100 or f5 along with my other stuff. I know I can shoot more easily, they are most likely more reliable, and I can still shoot film.
    I don't have a passion for modern camera either. I actually found them more difficult to use than the old cameras as they have way to many functions and automation. The F5 is quite slow to use in manual mode. It takes much longer to change shutter speed from say 1s to 1/125s on the F5 than on the F3. The same for aperture. The F5 is ok but manual focusing is a little bit more difficult than the F3. I actually don't have a passion for mechanical cameras either, I like electronic one but simple one. But with the situation of film availability now I really not worry about the reliability of any of my cameras I worry more about where do I get the next roll of film and how I get it processed.

  9. #49
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    Why shoot film on automatic, pro/high-end cameras?

    I use late era EOS bodies, because I have EF series lenses from my digital cameras.

    On the longer lenses, the vibration reduction comes in handy at times. I seldom use the cameras in full auto, but that can be handy as well.

    I do have a selection of older fully manual cameras, that I enjoy as well. The only drawback for them, is the quick grab shot is much mor difficult.

    My ancient Aires is a kick, because the images come out looking like they were captured 50 years ago. I've been all through it. It is clean, and accurate. It was just born before a lot of the advances in lenses came about, and it was not a premium piece of equipment in the first place.

  10. #50
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    "Modern" 35mm camera bodies like the F5/6/N90(s) and the EOS range of slr's allow 1/3 f-stop adjustment of shutter speeds and/or aperture(using compatible lenses mind you).

    To folk like myself who enjoy using slide film, with its lower dynamic range than negative materials, frankly NEED those tiny adjustments, to get the best results possible.

    Also, if you have a chance to use the G-series Nikkor AF lenses, i think you'll find yourself floored by the results capable with these "digital" lenses. I use the 50mm 1.8G for my own shooting, and its WAY sharper corner-->corner than my 1.4 AI-S MF lens. Horses for courses, the 1.4AIS has more 'character' than the 1.8G IMO, but the AF is plenty fast, and the sharpness really aids in making clearer, more well defined pictures with these 'miniature' format cameras(vs my 645 or 8x10 cameras ).

    YMMV, these are just my observations

    Dan


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