Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,940   Posts: 1,585,691   Online: 1010
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    28
    Images
    1

    OM4 alternatives

    Hi All,

    This is my first post here in this really nice forum. I'm shooting film for about 4 month. I'm a happy owner of a nice OM2n camera, and I really like it. I learned about photography much more during this small period than with my DSLR in years before!

    I've also realized the drawbacks as well. The first big drawback for me is scanning which is a pain. The second big drawback that I want more and more equipment.

    To be honest I'd like to have more than one camera bodies for different types of films. One for Color-slide, one for fast B/W and one for slow B/W.

    I'd like to have a second body with spot metering abilities. Here it is my issue: I find my logical choice the OM3/4 family too expensive (although they are very attractive cameras). For me Canon EF mount is also an alternative, but I don't know too much about these cameras. I'm looking for a cheap one (less than 100 euros/dollars) with spot metering abilities, if there are any. What's your experience, is it possible?

    My last secret wish is a portable medium format camera. It's a completely unknown territory for me. Any ideas with these constrains (spot metering, reasonable size and price (max 2-300 euros))?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    320
    Images
    10
    To keep it simple, the most obvious solution would be to add a second OM body. If you find the OM3/4 too expensive, maybe an OM2sp can fit your need. It is pretty similar to an ONM2 with spot metering capability.

    The question now is to find one 100% working. I am not sure these cameras age well so it could be a challenge.

    Other solutions exist (Nikon, Pentax, you name it) but you lose the compatibility with what you already have.

    For $200-300, I am not sure you will find the MF camera you want as such camera would be rather recent and would command a higher price tag.

    Take care... and welcome to the forum!

  3. #3
    mr rusty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    lancashire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    651
    Images
    106
    Ha Ha GAS GAS GAS!!

    Seriously, before I built a darkroom, I used a lab which would develop and scan, so I got back negs and files. I hate home-scanning too.

    Once you have built your darkroom (!!) you will find at least B&W is easy to process and print yourself. I still send colour out, and doubt I will ever bother doing my own colour processing.

    Re portable MF camera. TLRs like the Yashicas are good fun, good quality and easily fit your budget - but lightweigt and easily portable. Some have meters, but not spot. I have just bought a Mamiya 645 with two lenses for £150. This is (reasonably) portable with a prism finder and in-built metering, but again not spot. Bigger and heavier than a TLR but with the benefit of easily changeable lenses and SLR handling.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,686
    Buy a spotmeter.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,337
    Never had that issue when shooting OM cameras. I started out with an OM10 and after it broke I got me an OM1. Then I bought the OM2SP which I sold again after a year or so due to the battery consumption. I replaced it with an OM2n and I never missed the spotmetering function. Mostly I carried 3 lenses. 28mm, 50mm and 135mm but I also had the 300mm f/4,5 though it saw little use.
    For odd reasons I would like to get an Olympus again but Im put of by the lens prices which, to me at least, seems higher than the compareable nikors though I have seen 180mm f/2,8 that wont break the bank.
    Best regards
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  6. #6
    nsurit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,332
    Images
    18
    OM 2S is the answer and you may still want to go to an OM 3 or 4 in the future. I have all of the single digit OM series of bodies and several of the OM 2S. It is my "go to" body. The downside is that when the meter goes, there is no fix. The circuits are no longer available. You should be able to get one for under $100. Good camera. Bill Barber

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    320
    You will struggle to find a MF camera with built-in spotmeter. Most of them are intended to be used with a handheld meter, although metered prisms are usually available.

    I just use the beeCam LightMeter app on my phone with my Bronica ETR, it's an incident meter and seems accurate enough for negative film providing you work within its limitations (eg metering from an area with the same light levels as the subject).

    €200-€300 should bag you a Bronica ETRS or ETRSi with 75mm lens, waist level finder and 120 film back. If you're lucky you'll have some money left over to spend on another lens or more film backs. The interchangeable backs are brilliant as you can just swap between them in seconds according to the situation - I tend to keep one loaded with Ilford HP5, one with FP4 and one with either Pan F or Delta 3200 depending on mood. One thing - if you buy one with a prism viewfinder (or decide that you don't get on with the waist level finder) then you will probably want the speed grip, as I find it almost impossible to hold the camera firmly without the grip if a prism finder is fitted. The waist level finder is fine without as you hold the camera lower and can therefore get a better grip.
    Matt

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    724
    Battery consumption with the OM2SP and the OM4 was not one of their finer points. The later OM4 models and the OM4Ti were OK after the circuit boards were modified. There was a way to tell which model of the OM4 was OK but I cannot recall at this minute.

    Mind you I did have reasonably good luck with the OM2SP when I remembered to turn the Shutter speed ring around the lens to the 'B' position when I had finished and this seemed to stop all battery usage when it wasn't being used and not just 'switched off' and the batteries lasted a lot longer.
    Last edited by BMbikerider; 10-30-2012 at 01:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    MrclSchprs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Maarssen (NL)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by BMbikerider View Post
    Battery consumption with the OM2SP and the OM4 was not one of their finer points. The later OM4 models and the OM4Ti were OK after the circuit boards were modified. There was a way to tell which model of the OM4 was OK but I cannot recall at this minute.
    I am not an expert, but as far as I know there never were later OM-4 models that did not suffer from the battery drain problem. There are OM-4 camera's with updated electronics, but Olympus only replaced the boards of camera's that came in for repair. The way to find out if a OM-4 model has an updated circuit board is to switch the camera to battery check mode. If the battery is full, the camera beeps. If the beeping stops after 30 seconds or so, the battery has the updated board. If the beeping does not stop, the camera has not been updated. The OM-4T or OM-4Ti never suffered from the battery drain problem.

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,955
    Images
    60
    For clarity, the OM2-Sp and the OM-2S are one and the same camera - just sold into different markets.

    I've been using my OM-2s since the 1980s. I just buy the silver oxide batteries in quantity, on the internet, and keep 4 or more in my camera bag at all times.

    Each set tends to last a few months.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin