Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,296   Posts: 1,535,729   Online: 854
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,333

    Fun coincidence and whats the Difference between AI and Pre-AI

    Paid my Photopusher a visit yesterday and came home with a 105 f/2,5 nikkor. I thought it was an AIS or at least an AI but according to MIR and the serial number which is actually the one mentioned on MIR its a pre-AI.
    Eccept for the exteriour and the f/32 minmum apperture on the pre-AI what are the differences
    Best regards
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    720
    You will find on the Non or pre AI lens the apperture ring is smooth completely all the way round the back edge. An AI lend will have a machined 'step' cut into the back edge, or a pre AI lens may have been converted to an AI type and will have the machined edge or even just a machined 'cut out' in place of the complete step.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    That machined step on an Ai lens matches up with a piece on F3 generation and newer Nikons to indicate the f-stop of the lens. A pre-AI lens can't be mounted on these cameras unless either 1) your camera has a little button that lets you swing the tab out of the way - if so, you can mount a Pre-AI lens and use stop-down metering. or 2) Your Pre-AI has been "Ai'd " which means the original smooth F-stop ring has been replaced be a new F-Stop ring with the appropriate Ai notch cut out. Nikon used to provide Ai kits for doing this. If your lens has been Ai'd, then you can use it on any Nikon SLR.
    If your lens has not been Ai'd, unfortunately, there aren't many kits left. However, there are a few people out there who will machine the cut-out in your existing f-stop ring.
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,378
    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren View Post
    Paid my Photopusher a visit yesterday and came home with a 105 f/2,5 nikkor. I thought it was an AIS or at least an AI but according to MIR and the serial number which is actually the one mentioned on MIR its a pre-AI.
    Eccept for the exteriour and the f/32 minmum apperture on the pre-AI what are the differences
    Best regards
    The f:32 minimum aperture denotes a Gauss type version. The earlier versions were a Sonnar derivative and had f:22 as a minimum. Factory Ai lenses had a step in the rear of the aperture ring as well as an extra scale of (smaller) aperture numbers to be show the aperture in use in the viewfinder, non-Ai lenses that were modified do not have the second scale. Sonnar or Gauss, Ai or pre-Ai, it's a superb lens.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,333
    Thanks guys. Fortunately it is Ai'd and it's in superb condition. According to the serialnumber its the first with the rubberized focussing ring Im a happy man.
    I read somewhere that some earlier 105mm lenses had curved appertureblades, mine hasn't
    Best regards
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    568
    One of the nicest lenses Nikon ever made.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Crabtree View Post
    One of the nicest lenses Nikon ever made.
    Undoubtedly; sold my AIS a few years ago unfortunately. I've only got the 2.0/85 AIS now; another greatblens.

    Can anyone explain the image quality differences between the Sonnar and the Gauss 105? Preferably with external differences as well?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,378
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTime View Post

    Can anyone explain the image quality differences between the Sonnar and the Gauss 105? Preferably with external differences as well?
    The Sonnar stops down to f:22, the Gauss to f:32. There were several versions of each, but the minimum F stop is the one sure way to distinguish between them.
    As for image quality, the one sure way to know is to get one of each and try them, they're not expensive and you can sell on the one you don't keep for what you payed or a bit more. I've had mine, a '60s Sonnar, for about 14 years and I'm still just tickled pink every time I look at the results. The Gauss version is reputed to be a bit sharper (!!) at close range.

    The Mir site is a good reference for different versions of all Nikkors.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    568
    I had three copies here last year just by coincidence of some trades I'd made. Since they were on hand, I tested them for sharpness and out of focus quality, plus spent some time just shooting with the Sonnar version.

    I've had the 1st Gauss version for some time, but seldom shot with it since it is not a focal length I use much. I only realized a couple years ago what a great lens this is. A Sonnar version showed up with some stuff from a friend, then a mint AI version showed up with some other stuff.

    The bottom line is that they are all great. Each newer version showed some improvement in sharpness, though all were really good. The sharpness difference between the two Gauss versions was just barely distinguishable to me with a much more precise setup than I would ever use in real life.

    I was already familiar with the character of my Gauss lens, so spent some time shooting with the Sonnar. In the end I kept the one I already had (early Gauss) and sold the Sonnar and AI on. I already had a friend interested in the AI, and sort of prefer the single coated look anyway. I didn't find any advantage to the Sonnar; it had a very nice look, but so do the redesigned ones. I have seen one claim that the very earliest Sonnars were the sharpest of all at infinity; I have no reason to doubt or to believe that, but the Gauss is so sharp it challenged my ability to test it. I suppose somebody might prefer one or the other for portraits, but I can't imagine being dissatisfied with any of them.

    Now, it would be great if I just had some use for it. I will say that this was a very handy focal length back when I had newspaper jobs.

  10. #10
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,628
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Crabtree View Post
    I ... sort of prefer the single coated look anyway.
    In B&W, color, both?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin