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  1. #71
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFC View Post
    My apologies for not wading through every answer to see if I'm duplicating anyone.

    In my experience, an image with low contrast requires a contrast boost after the scan. And whenever contrast is boosted, flaws and artifacts start to emerge. The most obvious will be increased grain, dust, and scratches. So an image may have great detail, such as a collapsible Summicron that I used to have, but I'd rather have a higher-contrast lens and high contrast film for scanning. That's why I miss Plus-X, which needed very little boost after scanning.
    If you're consistently getting results that are too low in contrast then you might consider increasing your development time. With a bit of experimentation you should be able to match the "Plus X" contrast range you like with any film.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #72
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    If you're consistently getting results that are too low in contrast then you might consider increasing your development time. With a bit of experimentation you should be able to match the "Plus X" contrast range you like with any film.
    Absolutely. Mark is right. Negative contrast is mostly in the hands of the person exposing and developing the negatives.

    Some films have more inherent contrast than others, but this just means that a lower contrast film needs to be treated differently to yield similar final contrast to a higher contrast film.

    It's a system that is connected, and every component matters to more or less extent. Technique is the most important component, in matching the qualities of the lens, the light, the film, the paper (and their developers). Everything has to fit together perfectly to make the most of it from a technical standpoint.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #73
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Yes but, again, that is really true only for black and white. With colour films, development time is not a variable. Changing development time can lead to colour casts. Not that I ever tried, that's the theory.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  4. #74
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Yes but, again, that is really true only for black and white. With colour films, development time is not a variable. Changing development time can lead to colour casts. Not that I ever tried, that's the theory.
    Color films can be adjusted too, same principles apply.

    Color films are essentially 3-layer B&W films with each layer having sensitivity to different colors. The silver develops just like B&W and help develop the dye image. The bleach step reverses the silver development and the fix washes all the silver away leaving the dye image.

    The wild card with color film is color balance can change a bit, but this is rarely a deal killer change in my experience.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #75
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The other thing I have found about color casts is that at least for me they normally come with too little exposure to say blue light, typical of shadows and home lighting or campfires or mixed lighting.

    The question then pops up do we want the colors to look 1-normal/real, say holding the warm glow of the fire or the cold blue found in the shade or 2-normal/real as if lit by sunlight?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #76

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    Some wonderful reading here...

    I'm a member of the "high contrast" (minimized light pollution in the shadows) group. One of the side benefits of living in a rural area is much improved star gazing due to less light pollution. If the dark sky is polluted with city lights the..... stars..... just.... ain't ..... there..... and there ain't no fixin' that. If I want my sky (shadows) polluted I'll turn on the yard lights and face them upwards... that's a-kin ta' "prefogging" my view.

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