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  1. #11

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    I think the operative term is "press the shutter, not the camera"

  2. #12
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I would encourage your students to press the shutter release, not the "shutter", it will damage it
    Last edited by benjiboy; 11-20-2012 at 07:35 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  3. #13
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I would encourage your students to press the shutter release, not the "shutter", it will damage it
    +1

  4. #14

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    Rubberband or tape a laser pointer to the camera, this when pointed at a wall a few yards away will show you if you are jiggling the camera as you press the shutter release.

  5. #15

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    Use a cable release!

  6. #16
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    Holding breath can actually, even if it is not noticed, cause a general tensioning of all the body.
    My strategy is: begin expiring. While expiring, stop a moment, take picture, go on expiring. The movement of the finger on the shutter release is like a "continuation" of the expiration movement.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #17

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    Does anyone else find it harder to gauge the tripping point with some electronic shutter releases?

    I assume that most of them have two push switches. The first wakes the meter up then the second trips the shutter. I usually end up gradually increasing pressure while hoping that I stop after hitting the first but before the second! Worst offenders seem to be motor winders - the three I have (Winder ME, ME II and MX) have no "feel" for the point where activating the meter turns to triggering the shutter.

    The older designs with a mechanical linkage have a far more noticeable "step" when you hit the meter activation point in their travel. The button on the ME body is a better shutter release, but I like using the winder for the extra grip it brings.
    Matt

  8. #18

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    That's very clever. You're addressing the OP?

  9. #19
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PentaxBronica View Post
    Does anyone else find it harder to gauge the tripping point with some electronic shutter releases?

    I assume that most of them have two push switches. The first wakes the meter up then the second trips the shutter. I usually end up gradually increasing pressure while hoping that I stop after hitting the first but before the second! Worst offenders seem to be motor winders - the three I have (Winder ME, ME II and MX) have no "feel" for the point where activating the meter turns to triggering the shutter.

    The older designs with a mechanical linkage have a far more noticeable "step" when you hit the meter activation point in their travel. The button on the ME body is a better shutter release, but I like using the winder for the extra grip it brings.
    Don't get me started, as with some digital cameras there is almost a second delay in pressing and taking.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #20
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    Once a year I shoot street scenes at night in the middle of winter (in canada). I've worked out how to do this very well.
    step 1) frame up
    step 2) focus (on af cameras half press the release)
    step 3) inhale deeply
    step 4) begin to exhale
    step 5) slowly press the shutter release the rest of the way as you exhale and fire a shot.
    step 6) hold down the release and fire a second time as you finish exhaling. (motor drive)

    This works best when the camera is at chest level, and your hands are both supporting it. Your centre of gravity is fairly precarious when the camera (not to mention all of your weight) is dependant on the top of your body such as when you have the camera at eye level. Keeping your head clear does help, as it keeps you calmer and thus less fidgety.
    I should point out, continuous AF is terrible for this because the camera might see a bird or random object and decide to refocus mid shot.

    The process takes about 4 seconds and yields two shots usually one perfectly sharp at slow speeds. I once pulled off a sharp image at 1/1.5's (2/3's)of a second on my nikon F80 when I was really in a zen space.

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