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  1. #41
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    At my photo club, I am regularly amazed by how many people express surprise and gratitude when we discuss these issues, because they have never had anyone help them with them before.

    I tell people the following (this assumes a prism finder):

    1. stand with weight evenly distributed between your feet, and weight on both the heels and balls of your feet;
    2. square your body so it is facing directly toward your subject;
    3. raise your camera to your eye and help support it by tucking your elbows into your body comfortably;
    4. the camera should be resting comfortably in your hands - not gripped tightly in your hands;
    5. all adjustments for focus and exposure and framing should be made to your satisfaction before moving to the instant of exposure;
    6. self-assess whether you feel any unusual tension in your body, and deal with it by relaxing it;
    7. inhale slowly but steadily, until you are comfortable, and then pause slightly;
    8. exhale gently until you are about half way, then pause slightly;
    9. squeeze the shutter release smoothly and carefully until the shutter releases, then pause very slightly thereafter;
    10. finish exhaling; and
    11. look again at the scene through the viewfinder, to see if something has appeared that may cause you to want to shoot another.

    Most of the above can be done far more quickly than it takes to type it or read it, and it can easily be reduced to near unconscious habit.

    As I understand it, the breathing part of the process is recommended by those who shoot firearms.

    EDIT: as mentioned below by E. von Hoegh, it can help to take several deep, unhurried breaths before the "half" breath at the time of exposure.
    What he said.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #42

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    Remember to aim the camera away from your face when pressing the button too.

  3. #43

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    I jab at it angrily with a stiffened forefinger.

  4. #44
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    What he said.


    Well, maybe.
    By the time that checklist is walked through, the scene has changed or gone.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #45
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Well, maybe.
    By the time that checklist is walked through, the scene has changed or gone.
    At first, you are right.

    But once the steps become ingrained as habit, the only parts that are slow are those that work because they are slow (e.g. unhurried breaths).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #46
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    I know some have expressed distaste for them, but I aquired a pair of soft touch release buttons that screw into/onto the stock shutter release on my FE and FM years ago. I find them most useful in this regard. Cured my "stabbing" immediately.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  7. #47
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    I know some have expressed distaste for them, but I aquired a pair of soft touch release buttons that screw into/onto the stock shutter release on my FE and FM years ago. I find them most useful in this regard. Cured my "stabbing" immediately.
    Can anybody explain to me how the "soft touch" release button is made?
    I thought it was just something you screw on the release button to have a larger surface to press your finger on. In which sense is it "softer"?

    Or does it have some sort of probe activating the shutter like the one in a cable release? In that case maybe it is softer because there is a soft spring and no need to win the resistance of the camera shutter release which is probably a bit stiffer. Is it that?
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Can anybody explain to me how the "soft touch" release button is made?
    I thought it was just something you screw on the release button to have a larger surface to press your finger on. In which sense is it "softer"?

    Or does it have some sort of probe activating the shutter like the one in a cable release? In that case maybe it is softer because there is a soft spring and no need to win the resistance of the camera shutter release which is probably a bit stiffer. Is it that?
    Soft touch is merely a large diameter button that increases the area your fingertip contacts. It screws into the cable release threads.

  9. #49
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Soft touch is merely a large diameter button that increases the area your fingertip contacts. It screws into the cable release threads.
    OK but then, why is it called "soft"? It shouldn't make the shutter release any softer, should it? What usefulness can it provide in real use?
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    OK but then, why is it called "soft"? It shouldn't make the shutter release any softer, should it? What usefulness can it provide in real use?
    Marketing.

    I got one with one of my bodies, found it awkward and prone to snagging on things, so don't use it. There's an analogous accessory for guns called a "trigger shoe".

    If you like them, if they make the shutter button feel better to you, then they're a good thing. I do use a trigger shoe on one of my guns, a rebarreled Mauser with a very narrow trigger - it gives a better feel for when it breaks.

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