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  1. #21
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    What I mean is instead of spending more and more money on buying more twenty plus year old cameras that most probably have never had any maintenance that you rarely us, I.M.O. the money is better spent on having fewer cameras that you have serviced and use on a regular basis that work reliably, and having several SLR bodys at home isn't going to help you because you can't carry them all when the one you're using in the field craps out on you.
    For the most part that is very good advice benjiboy. I read a lot of posts where people buy replacement cameras and have no intention of ever fixing them if they break. But there are also those who buy and use their cameras because they enjoy them.

    For the first 30 years of my married life I used a Minolta SRT 101 that I bought new right out of high school, and a Pentax K1000 SE that I bought used at a pawn shop a few years later. They were, and still are, magnificent cameras and I still enjoy working with them almost continually. But I also spent those 30+ years avidly gobbling up every single Popular Photography mag that came to my door, drooling all over the nice, fancy cameras that came out year after year. Back then I could barely afford to buy 35mm consumer film after each paycheck was used to support a growing family. Now I can afford to go back and try out some of those cameras that I coveted way back then. Some I have fallen in love with, others I have tried and sold because they didn't turn out as nice as I had imagined.

    The point being, some of us truly enjoy photography for the image...and sometimes the tools as well. Sometimes you just want to hold and use a Leica...or a Nikon F...or a Crown Graphic...or a Pentax 645...

  2. #22
    ArtO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post

    For the most part that is very good advice benjiboy. I read a lot of posts where people buy replacement cameras and have no intention of ever fixing them if they break. But there are also those who buy and use their cameras because they enjoy them.

    For the first 30 years of my married life I used a Minolta SRT 101 that I bought new right out of high school, and a Pentax K1000 SE that I bought used at a pawn shop a few years later. They were, and still are, magnificent cameras and I still enjoy working with them almost continually. But I also spent those 30+ years avidly gobbling up every single Popular Photography mag that came to my door, drooling all over the nice, fancy cameras that came out year after year. Back then I could barely afford to buy 35mm consumer film after each paycheck was used to support a growing family. Now I can afford to go back and try out some of those cameras that I coveted way back then. Some I have fallen in love with, others I have tried and sold because they didn't turn out as nice as I had imagined.

    The point being, some of us truly enjoy photography for the image...and sometimes the tools as well. Sometimes you just want to hold and use a Leica...or a Nikon F...or a Crown Graphic...or a Pentax 645...


    Amen to that. I love the equipment.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Art

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post

    For the most part that is very good advice benjiboy. I read a lot of posts where people buy replacement cameras and have no intention of ever fixing them if they break. But there are also those who buy and use their cameras because they enjoy them.

    For the first 30 years of my married life I used a Minolta SRT 101 that I bought new right out of high school, and a Pentax K1000 SE that I bought used at a pawn shop a few years later. They were, and still are, magnificent cameras and I still enjoy working with them almost continually. But I also spent those 30+ years avidly gobbling up every single Popular Photography mag that came to my door, drooling all over the nice, fancy cameras that came out year after year. Back then I could barely afford to buy 35mm consumer film after each paycheck was used to support a growing family. Now I can afford to go back and try out some of those cameras that I coveted way back then. Some I have fallen in love with, others I have tried and sold because they didn't turn out as nice as I had imagined.

    The point being, some of us truly enjoy photography for the image...and sometimes the tools as well. Sometimes you just want to hold and use a Leica...or a Nikon F...or a Crown Graphic...or a Pentax 645...
    Couldn't agree more. I've given up on DSLRs (only have a Fuji XE-1 now). Tried film Leicas and rangefinders just don't work well for me (let alone the prices). I just recently received my fathers old Nikon F that he bought back in 1964. We all (including him) thought it was long gone. He found it way up in their attic. Never been so happy in my life! As the keeper of all our entire family photographs and kodachromes, I was almost overwhelmed when he handed it to me.

    I'll need to replace the seals and should get a good CLA. Can't wait to run film through it.

  4. #24
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    try without replacing the seals first. my nikon fms work without the seals, because the door is designed with a light trap that seems to work without seals, at least with mine.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post

    For the most part that is very good advice benjiboy. I read a lot of posts where people buy replacement cameras and have no intention of ever fixing them if they break. But there are also those who buy and use their cameras because they enjoy them.

    For the first 30 years of my married life I used a Minolta SRT 101 that I bought new right out of high school, and a Pentax K1000 SE that I bought used at a pawn shop a few years later. They were, and still are, magnificent cameras and I still enjoy working with them almost continually. But I also spent those 30+ years avidly gobbling up every single Popular Photography mag that came to my door, drooling all over the nice, fancy cameras that came out year after year. Back then I could barely afford to buy 35mm consumer film after each paycheck was used to support a growing family. Now I can afford to go back and try out some of those cameras that I coveted way back then. Some I have fallen in love with, others I have tried and sold because they didn't turn out as nice as I had imagined.

    The point being, some of us truly enjoy photography for the image...and sometimes the tools as well. Sometimes you just want to hold and use a Leica...or a Nikon F...or a Crown Graphic...or a Pentax 645...
    I'm not a camera fondler, or collector I like to think of myself as a practical photographer, and the equipment as a means to an end, not an end in itself.
    Ben

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I think this has been shown to be mythology as the difference in tension in an uncocked spring compared with a @#!*% spring is very small. i.e. in an uncocked state the spring is still in tension, probably around 80% of the @#!*% tension, in order to get a more linear response. If the spring went slack at the end of the movement there would be a huge difference in tension across the travel of the shutter resulting in it slowing down towards the end of its travel.


    Steve.
    Steve's right. Also, springs do not look at clocks. Cycling the spring will add to the cumulative metal fatigue, too. But, have you ever heard of a valve spring breaking in an auto engine? In a four cylinder four stroke engine, at least two of the springs are under extra tension all the time. Breakages are extremely rare, as in unheard of.

    Al that said, I don't leave either my cameras or my guns @#!*% .

  7. #27
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Is there some sort of $%@#$&ing censoring going on? My original post doesn't look like that!

    I don't leave my focal plane shuttered cameras cocked (there, I wrote it) but my Bronica and Mamiya cameras are designed so that the lenses can only be taken off and put back on in the cocked state and that's the way they stay.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #28
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    I don't know if anyone else has said this, but you should leave all mechanics in a position of rest. Store your lenses at their widest aperture setting to avoid stretching the springs, and store cameras un-cocked. If you have shuttered lenses, it's especially important not to leave them cocked for long periods of time, as it will affect the actual shutter speed (rangefinders and some medium format SLRs.)
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  9. #29
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKDobbs View Post
    I don't know if anyone else has said this, but you should leave all mechanics in a position of rest. Store your lenses at their widest aperture setting to avoid stretching the springs, and store cameras un-cocked
    Yes, someone has said that. And we have replied that it is nonsense as in an un-cocked state, a spring is still under tension.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #30
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Yes, someone has said that. And we have replied that it is nonsense as in an un-cocked state, a spring is still under tension.


    Steve.

    in addition, some cameraand lens manufacturers, hsselblad for example specifically recommend storing in a cocked position
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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